Etymology
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alignment (n.)

1790, "arrangement in a line," from French alignement, from aligner "to arrange in a line" (see align). Political sense is from 1933.

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tagline (n.)

"punchline of a joke," 1926, originally "last line in an actor's speech" (1916), from tag (n.1) + line (n.).

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dominance (n.)

"rule, control; authority; ascendancy," 1819; see dominant + -ance. Perhaps from French dominance (by 1743). Related: Dominancy.

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self-discipline (n.)

"ability to restrain or guide or control oneself," 1690s; see self- + discipline (n.). Related: Self-disciplined.

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align (v.)

early 15c., "to copulate" (of wolves, dogs), literally "to range (things) in a line," from Old French alignier "set, lay in line" (Modern French aligner), from à "to" (see ad-) + lignier "to line," from Latin lineare "reduce to a straight line," from linea (see line (n.)). Transitive or reflexive sense of "fall into line" is from 1853. The international political sense is attested from 1934. The French spelling with -g- is unetymological, and aline was an early form in English. Related: Aligned; aligning.

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linage (n.)

1883, "position in a line," from line (n.) + -age. From 1884 as a rough measure of printed material from the number of lines of text. Also "a payment or charge per line of print" (1888).

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reline (v.)

also re-line, "line (a coat, painting, etc.) again or anew, provide with fresh lining," by 1839, from re- "back, again" + line (v.1). Related: Relined; relining

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liner (n.1)

"vessel belonging to a shipping line," 1838, from line (n.) on notion of a succession of ships plying between ports along regular "lines," as distinguished from transient ships using those ports. (Line in this sense is attested by 1786 in reference to stagecoaches.) Earlier it meant "man of war, ship of the line" (1829). Meaning "cosmetic for highlighting the eyes" is from 1926. The type of baseball hit (forcible and parallel to the ground) was so called from 1874 (line drive is attested from 1899).

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landline (n.)

also land-line, by 1861, originally a telegraph wire run over land (as opposed to under sea); from land (n.) + line (n.). Later (by 1965), a telephone line which uses wire or some other material (distinguished from a radio or cellular line).

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lineament (n.)

early 15c., liniament, "distinctive feature of the body, outline," from Latin lineamentum "contour, outline; a feature," literally "a line, stroke, mark," from lineare "to reduce to a straight line" (here apparently in an unrecorded sense "trace lines"), from linea "string, thread, line" (see line (n.)). Figurative sense of "a characteristic" is attested from 1630s.

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