Etymology
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CDC 
abbreviation of Centers for Disease Control, renamed 1970 from earlier U.S. federal health lab, originally Communicable Diseases Center (1946). Since 1992, full name is Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but the usual initialism (acronym) remains CDC.
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neckline (n.)

also neck-line, "shape of the top of a woman's garment at the front," 1900, from neck (n.) + line (n.).

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align (v.)

early 15c., "to copulate" (of wolves, dogs), literally "to range (things) in a line," from Old French alignier "set, lay in line" (Modern French aligner), from à "to" (see ad-) + lignier "to line," from Latin lineare "reduce to a straight line," from linea (see line (n.)). Transitive or reflexive sense of "fall into line" is from 1853. The international political sense is attested from 1934. The French spelling with -g- is unetymological, and aline was an early form in English. Related: Aligned; aligning.

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tagline (n.)
"punchline of a joke," 1926, originally "last line in an actor's speech" (1916), from tag (n.1) + line (n.).
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linage (n.)
1883, "position in a line," from line (n.) + -age. From 1884 as a rough measure of printed material from the number of lines of text. Also "a payment or charge per line of print" (1888).
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joy-stick (n.)

also joystick, 1910, aviators' slang for the control lever of an airplane, from joy + stick (n.). Transferred sense of "small lever to control movement" is from 1952; later especially in reference to controlling images on a screen (1978). As slang for "dildo," probably from early 1930s.

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self-government (n.)

1734, of persons, "self-control;" 1798, of states, nations, provinces, cities, etc., "administration of its own affairs without outside direction or interference," from self- + government. Related: Self-governing (1680s); self-governed (1709 as an adjective, of persons, "marked by self-control").

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liner (n.1)
"vessel belonging to a shipping line," 1838, from line (n.) on notion of a succession of ships plying between ports along regular "lines," as distinguished from transient ships using those ports. (Line in this sense is attested by 1786 in reference to stagecoaches.) Earlier it meant "man of war, ship of the line" (1829). Meaning "cosmetic for highlighting the eyes" is from 1926. The type of baseball hit (forcible and parallel to the ground) was so called from 1874 (line drive is attested from 1899).
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controllable (adj.)

"capable of being checked or restrained," c. 1600, from control (v.) + -able.

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reline (v.)

also re-line, "line (a coat, painting, etc.) again or anew, provide with fresh lining," by 1839, from re- "back, again" + line (v.1). Related: Relined; relining

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