Etymology
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Middle Earth (n.)

"the earth regarded as placed midway between heaven and hell or the abode of the gods and the underworld," late 13c., from middle (adj.) + earth. Altered from earlier middel-erd (late 12c.), midden-erd, itself an alteration (by association with Middle English eard "dwelling") of Old English middangeard (see Midgard).

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liken (v.)
late 13c., "to represent or describe as like, compare," from like (adj.) + -en (1). Related: Likened; likening.
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lifelike (adj.)
1610s, "likely to live," from life (n.) + like (adj.). Meaning "exactly like the living original" is from 1725.
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comme ci, comme ca (adv., adj.)

"so-so," 1945, from French comme ci, comme ça, literally "like this, like that."

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Turkoman 
also Turcoman, c. 1600, from Medieval Latin Turcomannus, from Persian Turkman, literally "Turk-like," from Turk + -man "like."
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sacre bleu (interj.)

an English notion of a stereotypical French oath, 1869, from French sacré bleu, literally "holy blue," a euphemism for sacré Dieu (1768), "holy God." From Old French sacrer, from Latin sacrare "to make or declare sacred" (see sacred). Such things are never idiomatic. In an old French-language comic set in the U.S. Wild West, the angry cowboys say "Bloody Hell!"

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resemble (v.)

"be like, have likeness or similarity to," mid-14c., from Old French resembler "be like" (12c., Modern French ressemble), from re-, here perhaps an intensive prefix, + sembler "to appear, to seem, be like," from Latin simulare "to make like, imitate, copy, represent," from stem of similis "like, resembling, of the same kind" (see similar).

Also formerly "to compare or liken (one to another); make an image of" (late 14c.). Related: Resembled; resembling.

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sigmoid (adj.)
"shaped like a C" (1660s) or "shaped like an S" (1786), from sigma (q.v.) + -oid. Especially of the flexure of the colon (1891).
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likewise (adv.)
mid-15c., from the phrase in like wise "in the same manner" (mid-15c.), from like (adj.) + wise (n.).
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Hell's Kitchen 

disreputable, impoverished New York City neighborhood, the name attested from 1879. The phrase was used from at least 1866 as an intensive form of Hell.

Hell's kitchen (American), a horrible slum. Hell's Kitchen, Murderer's Row, and the Burnt Rag are names of localities which form collectively the worst place in New York. [Albert Barrère and Charles G. Leland, "A Dictionary of Slang, Jargon & Cant," 1889]
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