Etymology
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unemployed (adj.)

1600, "at leisure, not occupied," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of employ (v.). Meaning "temporarily out of work" is from 1660s. There seems not to have been a verb *unemploy, but disemploy was used (1610s). The noun meaning "unemployed persons collectively" is from 1782.

No man has hired us
With pocketed hands
And lowered faces
We stand about in open places
And shiver in unlit rooms ...
[T.S. Eliot, from "Choruses from the Rock"]
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timewise (adv.)

also time-wise, 1898, from time (n.) + wise (n.).

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peacetime (n.)

also peace-time, "time when a country is not at war," 1550s, from peace + time (n.).

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first-timer (n.)

"rookie, one doing something for the first time," 1888, from first time; see first (adj.) + time (n.).

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mealtime (n.)

also meal-time, "usual time for eating a meal," early 13c., from meal (n.1) + time (n.). Etymologically a tautology.

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synchronous (adj.)

1660s, "existing or happening at the same time," from Late Latin synchronus "simultaneous," from Greek synkhronos "happening at the same time," from syn- "together" (see syn-) + khronos "time" (see chrono-). Meaning "recurring at the same successive instants of time" is attested from 1670s. Related: Synchronously.

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foretime (n.)

"a previous time," 1530s, from fore- + time (n.). Related: Foretimes.

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suppertime (n.)

also supper-time, late 14c., from supper + time (n.).

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bedtime (n.)

also bed-time, "the usual hour of going to rest," early 13c., from bed (n.) + time (n.). Bed-time story is attested from 1867.

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temporal (adj.)

late 14c., "worldly, secular;" also "terrestrial, earthly; temporary, lasting only for a time," from Old French temporal "earthly," and directly from Latin temporalis "of time, denoting time; but for a time, temporary," from tempus (genitive temporis) "time, season, moment, proper time or season," from Proto-Italic *tempos- "stretch, measure," which according to de Vaan is from PIE *temp-os "stretched," from root *ten- "to stretch," the notion being "stretch of time." Related: Temporally.

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