Etymology
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right hand (n.)

the hand opposed to the left hand, late Old English rihthand; see right (adj.2) + hand (n.). So called as the one normally the stronger of the two. Applied to the right side generally by c. 1200. As a symbol of friendship or alliance, by 1590s. Figurative for "indispensable helper, person of use or importance," 1520s (right-hand man is attested by 1660s). Right-handed "having the right hand more useful than the left" is attested from late 14c.; as an adjective from c. 1700. Right-hander, of persons, "one who uses the right hand more skillfully than the left" is by 1885.

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Midi 

"southern France," 1883, from French midi "south," literally "midday" (12c.), from mi "middle" (from Latin medius "middle;" see medial (adj.)) + di "day" (from Latin dies, from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine"). At midday in the northern hemisphere the sun is in the south of the sky. Compare Latin meridianus "of midday, of noon;" also "southerly, to the south" (see meridian), and Middle English mid-dai in its secondary sense "south, to the south" (late 14c.).

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Rigel 

bright star in Orion, 1590s, Rigel Algeuze, from Arabic Rijl Jauzah al Yusra "the Left Leg of the Central One," from rijl "foot."

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hangover (n.)

also hang-over, 1894, "a survival, a thing left over from before," from hang (v.) + over. Meaning "after-effect of excessive drinking" is attested by 1902, American English, on notion of something left over from the night before. As an adjective, in reference to a person, overhung (1964) has been used but is rare; that word meaning generally "placed so as to project or jut out" (1708).

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pock (v.)

"to disfigure or mark with pustules or the pits left by them," 1841 (implied in pocked), from pock (n.). Related: Pocking.

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dextro- 

word-forming element meaning "toward or on the right-hand side," from combining form of Latin dexter (from PIE root *deks- "right, opposite of left; south").

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remain (v.)

early 15c., remainen, "be left after the removal or loss of a part, number, or quality; survive," from Anglo-French remayn-, Old French remain- (as in il remaint "it remains"), stressed stem of remanoir "to stay, dwell, remain; be left; hold out," from Latin remanere "to remain, to stay behind; be left behind; endure, abide, last" (source also of Old Spanish remaner, Italian rimanere), from re- "back" (see re-) + manere "to stay, remain" (from PIE root *men- (3) "to remain").

Also from early 15c. as "continue" in someone's charge or possession; continue in a certain place or condition." From early 15c. in mathematics. Related: Remained; remaining.

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knot-hole (n.)
also knothole, "hole left in a plank or board after a knot has dropped out," 1726, see knot (n.) + hole (n.).
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dryas (n.)

evergreen shrub found in cold or Alpine regions in the northern hemisphere, 1798, from Greek dryas (see dryad). As an indicator of tundra climate, the presence of its remains in lake-bed sediments lent its name to the Younger Dryas, the name given to the period of sharp and sudden return to Ice Age conditions in Europe c. 12,000 years ago.

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mamzer (n.)

"bastard," 1560s, from Late Latin mamzer, from Hebrew mamzer, left untranslated in Deuteronomy xxiii.2 in the Vulgate. Modern uses (from mid-20c.) probably are from Yiddish.

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