Etymology
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telluric (adj.)

1800, "containing tellurium;" 1835, "pertaining to or proceeding from the earth;" 1836, "pertaining to Earth as a planet;" the last two senses from Latin tellus, tellum (genitive telluris) "earth, the earth" (see tellurian) + -ic.

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dubiety (n.)

"doubtfulness, dubiousness," 1650s, from Late Latin dubietas "doubt, uncertainty," from Latin dubius "vacillating, fluctuating," figuratively "wavering in opinion, doubting" (see dubious). Earlier in the same sense were dubiosity (1640s), dubiousness (1650s); also see dubitation.

Ignorance is the mother of two filthy daughters; the first daughter of Ignorance is called dubiety, or doubtfulnesse, which is a continual wavering in opinion; a knowing man hath a fixt spirit, and settled judgement, but an ignorant man is a double-minded man, though he be never so resolute and wilful in his opinions. [W. Geering, "The Mischiefes and Danger of the Sin of Ignorance," London, 1659]
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dernier (adj.)

"last, final," c. 1600, from French dernier, which is formed as if from Medieval Latin *deretranacius, from de "down" (see de-) + Latin retro "back" (see retro-).

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slipknot (n.)

also slip-knot, 1650s, from slip (v.) + knot (n.). One which easily can be "slipped" or undone by pulling on the loose end of the last loop.

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eschaton (n.)

"divinely ordained climax of history," 1935, coined by Protestant theologian Charles Harold Dodd (1884-1973) from Greek eskhaton, neuter of eskhatos "last, furthest, uttermost" (see eschatology).

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cenacle (n.)

"dining room," usually with reference to the room in which the Last Supper was held, c. 1400, from Old French cenacle, learned variant of cenaille (14c., Modern French cénacle), from Latin cenaculum "dining room," from cena "mid-day meal, afternoon meal," literally "portion of food" (from PIE *kert-sna-, from root *sker- (1) "to cut"). Latin cenaculum was used in the Vulgate for the "upper room" where the Last Supper was eaten. Related: Cenatical; cenation.

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resort (n.)

late 14c., "that to which one has recourse for aid or assistance, source of comfort and solace," from Old French resort "resource, a help, an aid, a remedy," back-formation from resortir "to resort," literally "to go out again," from re- "again" (see re-) + sortir "go out" (see sortie).

The meaning "place people go for recreation" is recorded by 1754. Phrase in the last resort "ultimately" (1670s) translates French en dernier ressort, originally a last court of legal appeals.

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finality (n.)

1540s, "a goal, a guiding object," from French finalité, from Late Latin finalitatem (nominative finalitas) "state of being final," from Latin finalis "last, of or pertaining to an end" (see final). From 1833 as "quality or state of being final."

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victual (v.)

mid-14c., "to stock or supply (a ship, garrison, etc.) with provisions to last for some time," from Anglo-French or Old French vitaillier (12c.), from vitaille (see victuals). Related: Victualed; victualing; Victualer; victualler.

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cognomen (n.)

1754, "a distinguishing name;" 1809, "a surname;" from Latin, from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see com-) + (g)nomen "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). The last of the three names by which a Roman citizen was known (Caius Julius Csar, Marcus Tullius Cicero).

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