Etymology
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vaterland (n.)

1852, from German Vaterland, from Vater (see father (n.)) + Land (see land (n.)).

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lowland (n.)

land lower than other land thereabouts, c. 1500, originally with reference to the southern and eastern regions of Scotland, from low (adj.) + land (n.). As an adjective from 1560s. Related: Lowlander.

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Henley 

town on the Thames in Oxfordshire, site of annual regatta since 1839. The name is Old English hean-leage "(settlement) at or by the high wood."

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Piltdown 

village in Sussex, England, site where a fossil humanoid skull was said to have been found (1912); it was proved a fraud in 1953.

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dreamland (n.)

"land or region seen in dreams," hence "the land of fancy or imagination," 1827, from dream (n.) + land (n.).

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Leicester 

Middle English, earlier Ligraceaster, Ligera ceaster (early 10c.) "Roman Town of the People Called Ligore," a tribal name, perhaps "dwellers by the River Ligor." For second element, see Chester. The site is the Roman Ratae Coritanorum, fortified tribal capital of the Coritani, whose name is of unknown origin, with a Celtic word for "ramparts." The modern name "is best regarded as a new descriptive term for a deserted site" [Watts, "Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names"].

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Kaaba (n.)

1734, Caaba, cube-shaped building in the Great Mosque of Mecca, containing the Black Stone, the most sacred site of Islam, from Arabic ka'bah "square house," from ka'b "cube."

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Bremen 

seaport city in northern Germany, from Old Saxon bremo "edge" (related to English brim (n.)), in reference to its site on a river bank.

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fairyland (n.)

also fairy-land, 1580s, from fairy + land (n.). Earlier simply Faerie (c. 1300).

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Samaria 

from Greek Samareia, from Aramaic (Semitic) Shamerayin, ultimately from Hebrew Shomeron, from Shemer, name of the owner who sold the site to King Omri (see I Kings xvi.24).

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