Etymology
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kinkajou (n.)
Central American mammal, 1796, from French (1670s), from an Algonquian word for the wolverine; the North American word was erroneously transferred by Buffon to the tropical animal.
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kingmaker (n.)
also king-maker, 1590s, originally in reference to Richard Nevil, Earl of Warwick (d. 1471), credited with elevating Edward IV and after restoring Henry VI.
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kingly (adj.)
late 14c., kyngly; see king (n.) + -ly (1). Related: Kingliness. Similar formation in German königlich, Old Frisian kenenglik, Danish kongelig.
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kinase (n.)

1902, from Greek kinein "to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + chemical suffix -ase.

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kingfisher (n.)
type of colorful European diving bird, mid-15c., originally king's fisher, for obscure reasons; see king + fisher.
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kindergartener (n.)
1872, "kindergarten teacher," from kindergarten + -er (1). The German form kindergartner is recorded in American English from 1863. As "kindergarten pupil," attested from 1935.
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kinesthesia (n.)

also kinaesthesia, "the sense of muscular movement," 1888, Modern Latin compound of elements from Greek kinein "to set in motion; to move" (from PIE root *keie- "to set in motion") + aisthēsis "perception" (see anesthesia). Earlier was kinaesthesis (1880).

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kinesthetics (n.)
also kinaesthetics, by 1893, from kinesthetic "pertaining to kinesthesia" + -ics.
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kindly (adv.)
c. 1200, cundeliche, "natively, congenitally; according to nature," from Old English gecyndelice "naturally;" see kind (adj.) -ly (2). From mid-13c. as "pleasantly, gladly, with kind feelings, in a kind manner." Also in Middle English, "by birth or descent; in the approved manner, properly" (late 14c.).
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kindle (v.)
c. 1200, cundel, "to set fire to, to start on fire," probably from a Scandinavian source akin to Old Norse kynda "to kindle, to light a fire," Swedish quindla "kindle," all of uncertain origin, + frequentative suffix -le. Figurative use (of feelings, passions, etc.) is from c. 1300. Intransitive sense "to begin to burn, to catch fire" is from c. 1400. Related: Kindled; kindling.

Modern sources do not connect it to Latin candela. In the literal sense, Old English had ontyndan "kindle, set fire to," from tendan "to kindle" (see tinder). The word was influenced in form, and sometimes in Middle English in sense, by kindel "to give birth" (of animals), "bring forth, produce" (c. 1200), from kindel (n.) "offspring of an animal, young one," from Old English gecynd (see kind (n.)) + -el.
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