Etymology
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screwdriver (n.)

also screw-driver, "tool like a blunt chisel which fits into the nick in the head of a screw and is used to turn it," 1779, from screw (n.) + driver. Meaning "cocktail made from vodka and orange juice" is recorded from 1956. (Screwed/screwy have had a sense of "drunk" since 19c.; compare slang tight "intoxicated," or perhaps the notion is "twisted").

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malic (adj.)

"pertaining to apples, obtained from the juice of apples," 1790 (in malic acid, in a translation of Fourcroy), from French malique, from Latin mālum "apple" from Greek mēlon (Doric malon) "apple," which is probably from the Pre-Greek substrate language. The Latin and Greek words also meant "fruit" generally, especially if exotic. The acid, discovered 1785 by Swedish/German chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele, was obtained from unripe apples and other fruits. 

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Bloody Mary 

the cocktail, attested from 1947 (originally touted in part as a hangover cure), said to be named for Mary Tudor, queen of England 1553-58, who earned her epithet for vigorous prosecution of Protestants. The drink earned its, apparently, simply for being red from tomato juice. The cocktail's popularity also coincided with that of the musical "South Pacific," which has a character named "Bloody Mary."

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prune (n.)

mid-14c., "a plum," also "a dried plum" (c. 1200 in place name Prunhill), from Old French pronne "plum" (13c.), from Vulgar Latin *pruna, fem. singular formed from Latin pruna, neuter plural of prunum "a plum," a dissimilated borrowing of Greek proumnon, from proumnē "plum tree," a word probably, like the tree itself, of Anatolian origin and thus from a language of Asia Minor. Slang meaning "disagreeable or disliked person" is from 1895. Prune juice is from 1807.

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exude (v.)

1570s (intransitive), "to ooze from a body by a natural or abnormal discharge, be secreted," as juice or gum from a tree, pus from a wound, or serous fluid from a blister, from Latin exudare/exsudare "ooze out like sweat," from ex "out, out of" (see ex-) + sudare "to sweat," from sudor "sweat" (see sweat (v.)). Transitive sense "to discharge slowly through the pores, give out gradually as moisture" is by 1755. Related: Exuded; exudes; exuding.

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lettuce (n.)
garden herb extensively cultivated for use as a salad, late 13c., letuse, probably somehow from Old French laitues, plural of laitue "lettuce" (cognate with Spanish lechuga, Italian lattuga), from Latin lactuca "lettuce," from lac (genitive lactis) "milk" (from PIE root *g(a)lag- "milk"); so called for the milky juice of the plant. Old English had borrowed the Latin word as lactuce.
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belladonna (n.)
1590s, "deadly nightshade" (Atropa belladonna), from Italian, literally "fair lady" (see belle + Donna); the plant so called supposedly because women made cosmetic eye-drops from its juice (a mid-18c. explanation; atropic acid, found in the plant, has a well-known property of dilating the pupils) or because it was used to poison beautiful women (a mid-19c. explanation). Perhaps a folk etymology alteration; Gamillscheg suggests it is ultimately of Gaulish origin.
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jerk off (v.)

slang, "perform male masturbation," by 1896, from jerk (v.) denoting rapid pulling motion + off (adv.). Compare come off "experience orgasm" (17c.). Farmer and Henley ("Slang and Its Analogues") also lists as synonyms jerk (one's) jelly and jerk (one's) juice. The noun jerk off or jerkoff as an emphatic form of jerk (n.2) is attested by 1968. As an adjective from 1957.

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trypsin (n.)
chief digestive enzyme of pancreatic juice, 1876, coined 1874 by German physiologist Wilhelm Friedrich Kühne (1837-1900), apparently from Greek tripsis "rubbing, friction" (from tribein "to rub, rub down, wear away," from PIE root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn") + chemical suffix -in (2). Said to be so called because it first was obtained (in 1862) by rubbing the pancreas with glycerin.
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pina colada (n.)

"long drink made with pineapple juice, rum, and coconut," 1923, from Spanish piña colada, literally "strained pineapple." The first word was originally "pine-cone" (and formerly pinna), from Latin pinea (see pineapple). Second word ultimately is from Latin colare "to strain" (see colander). Ayto ("Diner's Dictionary") writes that the drink probably originated in Puerto Rico and "enjoyed a certain vogue in the mid to late 1970s," as evidenced by a certain song.

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