Etymology
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warm (v.)

Old English wyrman "make warm" and wearmian "become warm;" from the root of warm (adj.). Phrase warm the bench is sports jargon first recorded 1907. Related: Warmed; warming.

SCOTCH WARMING PAN. A wench. [Grose, "Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1785]
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borderline (n.)

also border-line, 1847, "strip of land along a frontier," from border (n.) + line (n.). As an adjective meaning "verging on" it is attested from 1903, originally in medical jargon.

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moot (adj.)

"debatable, subject to discussion," by 1650s, from moot case (1570s), earlier simply moot (n.) in the specialized sense "discussion of a hypothetical law case" (1530s) in law student jargon. The reference is to students gathering to test their skills in mock cases.

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washboard (n.)

also wash-board, clothes-cleaning device, 1882, from wash (v.) + board (n.1). As a percussion instrument, attested from 1925; in reference to abdominal muscles, recorded from 1950 in boxing jargon. Earlier such muscle development was described as checkerboard (1893).

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localitis (n.)

"obsession with the problems of one's locality and consequent failure to see big pictures," 1943, U.S. World War II jargon, originally of military strategists, from local (adj.) + transferred use of medical suffix -itis.

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cant (v.1)

1560s, "to speak in a whining voice," from cant (n.1). From c. 1600 as "to speak in the jargon of thieves and vagabonds;" 1670s as "talk hypocritically in pompous phraseology." Related: Canted; canting.

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opportunism (n.)

"policy of adopting actions to circumstances while holding goals unchanged," 1870, originally a word in continental politics; see opportune + -ism. Compare opportunist. Later, in the jargon of socialism and communism, "policy of concession to bourgeois society in the course of developing socialism."

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APB 

also a.p.b., "general alarm," 1960, police jargon initialism (acronym) for all-points bulletin, itself attested by 1953 (perhaps more in detective novels than in actual police use). The notion is "information of general importance," broadcast to all who can hear it.

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trim (n.)

"state of being prepared," 1580s, nautical jargon, "fit for sailing," from trim (v.). From 1570s as "ornament, decoration;" the meaning "visible woodwork of a house" is recorded from 1884; sense of "ornamental additions to an automobile" is from 1922. Slang meaning "a woman regarded as a sex object" is attested from 1955, American English.

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obtund (v.)

c. 1400, obtunden, (transitive) "to render dead, make dull, blunt, deaden," used occasionally in English, especially in medical jargon; from Latin obtundere "to blunt, make dull, weaken, exhaust," literally "to beat against" (see obtuse). Related: Obtundation; obtunded.

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