Etymology
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scenary (n.)
1690s, obsolete nativized form of Italian scenario (see scenario).
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archipelago (n.)
c. 1500, from Italian arcipelago "the Aegean Sea" (13c.), from arci- "chief, principal," from Latin archi- (see arch-) + pelago "pool; gulf, abyss," from Medieval Latin pelagus "pool; gulf, abyss, sea," from Greek pelagos "sea, high sea, open sea, main" (see pelagic).

The elements of the word are Greek, but there is no record of arkhipelagos in ancient or Medieval Greek (the modern word in Greek is borrowed from Italian), so the word perhaps is an Italian compound or an alteration in Italian of Medieval Latin Egeopelagus, from Greek Aigaion pelagos "Aegean Sea." The Aegean being full of island chains, the meaning was extended in Italian to "any sea studded with islands" (a sense attested in English from c. 1600) and to the islands themselves. Related: Archipelagian; archipelagic.
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verism (n.)
"the theory that art and literature should strictly reproduce truth," 1892, from Italian verismo, from vero "truth," from Latin verus "true" (from PIE root *were-o- "true, trustworthy") + -ismo, Italian form of -ism.
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totalitarianism (n.)

1926, first in reference to Italian fascism, from totalitarian + -ism.

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palazzo (n.)

"large and imposing building," 1660s, from Italian palazzo (see palace).

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sinfonia (n.)
1773, from Italian sinfonia, from Medieval Latin symphonia (see symphony).
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scaramouche (n.)

1660s, name of a cowardly braggart (supposed by some to represent a Spanish don) in traditional Italian comedy, from Italian Scaramuccia, literally "skirmish," from schermire "to fence," from a Germanic source (such as Old High German skirmen "defend"); see skirmish (n.). According to OED, a vogue word in late 17c. London due to the popularity of the character as staged there by Italian actor Tiberio Fiurelli (1608-1694).

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si 
"yes" in Italian and Spanish; from Latin sic "so" (see sic).
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figurine (n.)
"small, ornamental human representation in pottery or other material work," 1854, from French figurine (16c.), from Italian figurina, diminutive of figura, from Latin figura "shape, form, figure" (from PIE root *dheigh- "to form, build"). Figurette is from 1850, from Italian.
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architrave (n.)
1560s as a feature of architectural columns; 1660s of window parts, from Italian architrave, from Latin archi- "beginning, origin" (see archon) + Italian trave "beam," from Latin trabem (nominative trabs) "beam, timber," from PIE root *treb- "dwelling" (see tavern).
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