Etymology
Advertisement
cross-wind (n.)

also crosswind, "a wind which blows across the direct course," 1725, from cross- + wind (n.1).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
cross-lots (adv., prep.)

"by a short cut directly through fields or open lots, not by roads and streets," 1825, from cross- + lot.

Related entries & more 
cross-purpose (n.)

1680s, "an opposing or counter purpose, a conflicting intention or plan," from cross- + purpose (n.). It is attested earlier as the name of a popular parlor game (1660s), and the phrase be at cross-purposes "have conflicting plans to attain the same end" (1680s) might be from the game.

Related entries & more 
cross-tie (n.)

"transverse connecting piece of lumber," later especially "a railway tie, timber placed under opposite rails for support and to prevent spreading," from cross- + tie (n.).

Related entries & more 
mashie (n.)

in golf, "straight-faced niblick," (Linskill's "Golf," 1889, calls it "a cross between a niblick and a lofting-iron"), historical version of a modern five iron, 1881, mashy, from Scottish, probably named for a mason's hammer, from French massue "club," from Vulgar Latin *mattiuca, from Latin mateola "a tool for digging" (see mace (n.1)). Related: Mashie-niblick (1903).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
ironwork (n.)
also iron-work, "objects made of iron," early 15c., from iron (n.) + work (n.). Related: Iron-worker (15c.). Iron works "iron foundry" is from 1580s.
Related entries & more 
ferric (adj.)
1799, "pertaining to or extracted from iron," from Latin ferrum "iron" (see ferro-) + -ic. Especially of iron with a valence of three.
Related entries & more 
motocross 

also moto-cross, "cross-country motorcycle racing," by 1956, from motorcycle + cross-country.

Related entries & more 
irony (adj.)
"of or resembling iron," late 14c., from iron (n.) + -y (2).
Related entries & more 
ferrous (adj.)
"pertaining to or containing iron," 1865, from Latin ferreus "made of iron," from ferrum "iron" (see ferro-). In chemistry, "containing iron," especially with a valence of two. Contrasted with ferric.
Related entries & more 

Page 5