Etymology
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immigrate (v.)

"to pass into a place as a new inhabitant or resident," especially "to move to a country where one is not a native, for the purpose of settling permanently there," 1620s, from Latin immigratus, past participle of immigrare "to remove, go into, move in," from assimilated form of in- "into, in, on, upon" (from PIE root *en "in") + migrare "to move" (see migration). Related: Immigrated; immigrating.

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shredded (adj.)

"torn into shreds," 1570s, past-participle adjective from shred (v.). Shredded wheat, grain cut into long filaments, frequently eaten for breakfast, is recorded from 1885.

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Endymion 

beautiful youth, son of Jupiter and Calyce, beloved by Moon-goddess Selene, from Greek, perhaps literally "diver, plunger," from endyein "to enter into, sink into, plunge, dive," which was used in reference to the sun or stars setting into the sea. On this theory, he originally was a solar deity, a personification of the setting sun.

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attunement (n.)

"a bringing into harmony," 1820, from attune + -ment.

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interrelate (v.)

also inter-relate, 1831 (implied in interrelated), transitive, "bring into reciprocal relation," from inter- "between" + relate (v.). Intransitive sense "come into reciprocal relation" is attested from 1912. Related: Interrelating.

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plunge (v.)

late 14c., plungen, "to put, throw, or thrust violently into; immerse, submerge," also intransitive, from Old French plongier "plunge, sink into; plunge into, dive in" (mid-12c., Modern French plonger), from Vulgar Latin *plumbicare "to heave the lead," from Latin plumbum "lead" (see plumb (n.)). Original notion perhaps is of a sounding lead or a fishing net weighted with lead. Figurative sense of "cast into some state or condition" (despair, etc.) is from late 14c. Related: Plunged; plunging. Plunging neckline in women's fashion is attested from 1949.

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disintegrate (v.)

1796, transitive, "separate into component parts, destroy the cohesion of," originally in geology, from dis- "do the opposite of" + integrate (v.). Intransitive sense, "to break apart, separate into its component parts," is by 1851. Related: Disintegrated; disintegrating.

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desertification (n.)

"process of becoming or making into a desert," especially "the turning of fertile land into arid waste as a result of human activity," 1973, from desert (n.1) + -fication "a making or causing." In French, désertisation is attested from 1968.

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bifid (adj.)

"cleft, forked, split halfway down into two equal parts," 1660s, from Latin bifidus "split into two parts," from bi- "two" (see bi-) + -fid, from stem of findere "to split" (from PIE root *bheid- "to split"). Related: Bifidity.

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subdivision (n.)

early 15c., "process of dividing into smaller parts;" mid-15c., "portion of land that has been divided," noun of action from subdivide. Sense of "plot of land broken into lots for housing development" is from 1911.

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