Etymology
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immerge (v.)
1620s (trans.), "immerse, plunge into (a fluid)," from Latin immergere "to dip, plunge into" (see immersion). Intransitive sense from 1706. Rare; the usual verb is immerse. Related: Immerged; immerging.
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scrap (v.1)

"to make into scrap, consign to a scrap-heap, break up (machinery) into scrap-iron," 1883 (in reference to locomotives), from scrap (n.1). Related: Scrapped; scrapping; scrappable.

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investigation (n.)
early 15c., from Old French investigacion (14c.), from Latin investigationem (nominative investigatio) "a searching into, a searching for," noun of action from past participle stem of investigare "to trace out, search after," figuratively "search into, investigate," from in- "in, into" (from PIE root *en "in") + vestigare "to track, trace," from vestigium "a footprint, a track" (see vestige).
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desertification (n.)

"process of becoming or making into a desert," especially "the turning of fertile land into arid waste as a result of human activity," 1973, from desert (n.1) + -fication "a making or causing." In French, désertisation is attested from 1968.

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bifid (adj.)
"cleft, forked, split halfway down into two equal parts," 1660s, from Latin bifidus "split into two parts," from bi- "two" (see bi-) + -fid, from stem of findere "to split" (from PIE root *bheid- "to split"). Related: Bifidity.
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disintegrate (v.)

1796, transitive, "separate into component parts, destroy the cohesion of," originally in geology, from dis- "do the opposite of" + integrate (v.). Intransitive sense, "to break apart, separate into its component parts," is by 1851. Related: Disintegrated; disintegrating.

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Endymion 
beautiful youth, son of Jupiter and Calyce, beloved by Moon-goddess Selene, from Greek, perhaps literally "diver, plunger," from endyein "to enter into, sink into, plunge, dive," which was used in reference to the sun or stars setting into the sea. On this theory, he originally was a solar deity, a personification of the setting sun.
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decompose (v.)

1750s, "to separate into components," from de- "opposite of" + compose (v.) in the sense of "make or form by uniting two or more things." Sense of "putrefy, become resolved into constituent elements" is by 1777. Related: Decomposed; decomposing.

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interrelate (v.)
also inter-relate, 1831 (implied in interrelated), transitive, "bring into reciprocal relation," from inter- "between" + relate (v.). Intransitive sense "come into reciprocal relation" is attested from 1912. Related: Interrelating.
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penetralia (n.)

"inmost parts or recesses of a building," especially a temple or shrine, 1660s, from Latin plural of penetral, from penetralis "interior," from the stem of penetrare "to put or get into, enter into" (see penetrate).

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