Etymology
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buzzer (n.)
c. 1600, "buzzing insect," agent noun from buzz (v.). Used 1870s in Britain of steam-powered whistles used to call or dismiss factory workers. In reference to electricity-powered mechanical devices that buzz, from 1882.
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gall (n.3)
"excrescence on a plant caused by the deposit of insect eggs," especially on an oak leaf, late 14c., from Latin galla "oak-gall," which is of uncertain origin. They were harvested for use in medicines, inks, dyes.
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gnat (n.)

Old English gnæt "gnat, midge, small flying insect," earlier gneat, from Proto-Germanic *gnattaz (source also of Low German gnatte, German Gnitze); perhaps literally "biting insect" and related to gnaw.

The gnatte is a litil fflye, and hatte culex he soukeþ blood and haþ in his mouþ a pipe, as hit were a pricke. And is a-countid a-mong volatiles and greueþ slepinge men wiþ noyse & wiþ bytinge and wakeþ hem of here reste. [Bartholomew Glanville, "De proprietatibus rerum," c. 1240, translated by John of Trevisa c. 1398 ]

Gnat-catcher, insectivorous bird of the U.S. woodlands, is from 1823.

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creepy (adj.)

1794, "characterized by creeping," from creep + -y (2). Meaning "having a creeping feeling in the flesh" is from 1831; that of producing such a feeling, the main modern sense, is from 1858. Creepy-crawly (n.) "a crawling insect or animal" is from 1858.

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quadricorn (adj.)

"having four horns," 1875; also, as a noun, "a four-horned animal or insect" (1848); see quadri- "four" + Latin cornus "horn" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). Alternative quadrucorn is older (c. 1600).

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carapace (n.)
"upper shell of a turtle or tortoise; shell of an insect, crustacean, etc.," 1836, from French carapace "tortoise shell" (18c.), from Spanish carapacho or Portuguese carapaça, which is of uncertain origin, perhaps somehow from Latin capa (see cape (n.1)). Related: Carapacial.
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fly (adj.)
slang, "clever, alert, wide awake," by 1811, perhaps from fly (n.) on the notion of the insect being hard to catch. Other theories, however, trace it to fledge or flash. Slang use in 1990s might be a revival or a reinvention.
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hexapod (n.)
"six-footed insect," 1660s, from Modern Latin hexapod-, stem of hexapodus, from Greek hex "six" (see six) + Greek pod-, stem of pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Greek hexapous (adj.) was used only with reference to poetic meter. As an adjective from 1856.
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centipede (n.)

"venomous, many-legged, insect-sized arthropod," 1640s (earlier in English in Latin form, c. 1600), from French centipède, from Latin centipeda "many-footed arthropod," from centum "hundred" (see hundred) + pedis, genitive of pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot"). Related: Centipedal.

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nidus (n.)

"nest, breeding place," especially the case or cell formed by an insect or spider for reception of its eggs, 1742, from Latin nidus "a nest," from Old Latin *nizdus (see nest (n.)). Figurative use by 1807. Classical plural is nidi.

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