Etymology
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inspired (adj.)
c. 1400, "communicated by divine or supernatural powers," past-participle adjective from inspire (v.). From 1660s as "infused with seemingly supernatural influence."
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register (n.2)
"assistant court officer in administrative or routine function," 1530s, now chiefly U.S., alteration of registrar (q.v) due to influence of register.
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blotch (n.)
c. 1600, perhaps an extension of blot (n.) by influence of botch or patch. Also from c. 1600 as a verb. Related: Blotched; blotching.
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woof (n.1)
"weft, texture, fabric," Old English owef, from o- "on" + wefan "to weave" (see weave). With unetymological w- by influence of warp or weft.
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affected (adj.2)
1530s, "favorably disposed" (now obsolete but preserved in disaffected), past-participle adjective from affect (v.1). From 1610s as "under the influence of, afflicted."
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adaptability (n.)

"quality that renders adaptable," 1660s, from adapt + -ability. In modern use especially in evolutionary biology, "variability in respect to, or under the influence of, external conditions."

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anesthetize (v.)

"bring under the influence of an anesthetic," 1848, from Latinized form of Greek anaisthētos "insensate, without feeling" (see anesthesia) + -ize. Related: Anesthetized; anesthetizing; anesthetization.

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oleander (n.)

"rose bay," a poisonous evergreen Mediterranean shrub, late 14c., oleaster, from Medieval Latin oleander, a word of uncertain origin, probably altered (by influence of Latin olea "olive tree") from Late Latin lorandrum, from Latin rhododendron (see rhododendron), which was itself altered by influence of Latin laurea "laurel," on resemblance of leaves. This round-about etymology is supported by the French word for it, laurier rose.

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portentous (adj.)

"of the nature of a portent, ominous," 1540s, from Latin portentosus "monstrous, marvelous, threatening," from portentem "portent," from portendere (see portend). Sometimes portentious, by influence of pretentious. Related: Portentously.

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phoebe (n.)

small North American flycatcher, the peewit, 1700, phebe, so called in imitation of its cry; the spelling was altered (1839) by influence of the woman's proper name Phoebe.

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