Etymology
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replace (v.)

1590s, "to restore to a previous place or position," from re- "back, again" + place (v.). Meaning "to take the place of" is recorded from 1753; that of "to fill the place of (with something else)" is from 1765. Related: Replaced; replacing.

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locomotion (n.)

1640s, "action or power of motion," from Latin loco "from a place" (ablative of locus "a place;" see locus) + motionem (nominative motio) "motion, a moving" (see motion (n.)). From 1788 as "movement from place to place."

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fireplace (n.)

also fire-place, c. 1700, from fire (n.) + place (n.).

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unfavorable (adj.)

also unfavourable, mid-15c. (implied in unfavorably), from un- (1) "not" + favorable (adj.).

"We must not indulge in unfavorable views of mankind, since by doing it we make bad men believe that they are no worse than others, and we teach the good that they are good in vain." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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wherever (adv.)

"at whatever place," late 13c., ware euere, from where + ever. Originally an emphatic extension of where. Meaning "at any place, at some place or another" is from 1660s.

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toponym (n.)

1939, "place name," from Greek topos "place" (see topos) + -onym "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name"). Toponymy "study of place names" is from 1876. Related: Toponymic; toponymics.

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marketplace (n.)

also market-place, late 14c., "place in which a market is held," usually an open space in a town, from market (n.) + place (n.). Figurative use is from 1942.

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ridicule (n.)

1670s, "absurd thing, object of mockery or contempt;" 1680s, "words or actions meant to invoke ridicule or excite laughter at someone's expense," from French ridicule, noun use of adjective (15c.), or from Latin ridiculum "laughing matter, a joke, a jest," noun use of neuter of ridiculus "laughable, funny, absurd," from ridere "to laugh" (see risible).

"He who brings ridicule to bear against truth, finds in his hand a blade without a hilt." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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rambling (adj.)

1620s, "wandering about from place to place," present-participle adjective from ramble (v.). From 1630s as "wandering from topic to topic."

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prosopopeia (n.)

also prosopopoeia, 1560s, from Latin prosopopoeia, from Greek prosōpopoiia "the putting of speeches into the mouths of others," from prosōpon "person; face; dramatic character," etymologically "that which is toward the eyes," from pros "to" (see pros-) + ōps "eye, face" (from PIE root *okw- "to see") + poiein "to make, form, do" (see poet). Generally, a rhetorical figure in which an imaginary or absent person, or abstraction or inanimate character, is made to speak or act. Sometimes Englished as prosopopy (1570s).

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