Etymology
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Cockaigne (n.)

"imaginary country of abundance and bliss, the abode of luxury and idleness, lubberland," c. 1300, from Old French Cocaigne (12c.), which is of obscure origin; speculation centers on words related to cook (v.) and cake (compare Middle Dutch kokenje, a child's honey-sweetened treat; also compare Big Rock Candy Mountain). The German equivalent is Schlaraffenland ("Land of Lazy Monkeys").

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nadir (n.)

late 14c., in astronomy, "imaginary point of the celestial sphere vertically opposite to the zenith of the sun; the inferior pole of the horizon," from Medieval Latin nadir, from Arabic nazir "opposite to," in nazir as-samt, literally "opposite direction," from nazir "opposite" + as-samt "road, path" (see zenith). Transferred sense of "lowest point" of anything is recorded by 1793.

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*aim- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to copy." 

It forms all or part of: emulate; emulation; emulous;  image; imaginary; imagination; imaginative; imagine; imago; imitable; imitate; imitative; imitator; inimitable.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Latin imago "image," aemulus "emulous," imitari "to copy, portray, imitate;" Hittite himma- "imitation, substitute."

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unfavorable (adj.)

also unfavourable, mid-15c. (implied in unfavorably), from un- (1) "not" + favorable (adj.).

"We must not indulge in unfavorable views of mankind, since by doing it we make bad men believe that they are no worse than others, and we teach the good that they are good in vain." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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collocate (v.)

"to set or place together," 1510s, from Latin collocatus, past participle of collocare "to arrange, place together, set in a place," from assimilated form of com "together" (see com-) + locare "to place," from locus "a place" (see locus). Related: collocated; collocating.

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emplacement (n.)

"a putting or fixing in place; a place or site," 1742, formerly also implacement; from French emplacement "place, situation," from verb emplacer, from assimilated form of en- "in" (see en- (1)) + placer "to place" from place "place, spot" (see place (n.)). Military sense of "the space within a fortification allotted for the position and service of a gun or battery" is attested from 1811.

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displace (v.)

1550s, "remove to a different place, put out of the usual place; remove from any position, office, or dignity," from Old French desplacer (15c., Modern French déplacer), from des- (see dis-) + placer "to place," from place "place, spot" (see place (n.)). Related: Displaced; displacing. Displaced person "refugee" is from 1944.

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loco- 
word-forming element meaning "from place to place," from combining form of Latin locus "a place" (see locus).
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itinerate (v.)
"to travel from place to place," c. 1600, from Late Latin itineratus, past participle of itinerare "to travel" (see itinerant). Especially "to travel from place to place preaching" (1775). Related: Itinerated; itinerating.
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locality (n.)

1620s, "fact of having a place," from French localité (16c.), from Late Latin localitatem (nominative localitas) "locality" (as a quality of bodies), from localis "belonging to a place, pertaining to a place," from Latin locus "a place, spot" (see locus). Meaning "a geographical place or district" is from 1830.

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