Etymology
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requital (n.)

"return for some service, kindness, etc.; act of requiting" for good or ill, 1570s, from requite + -al (2).

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misdemeanor (n.)

also misdemeanour, late 15c., "ill-behavior, evil conduct, fault," but almost always used in the legal sense of "an indictable offense of less grave nature than a felony;" from mis- (1) "wrong" + Middle English demenure "conduct, management" (see demeanor). Related: Misdemeanors; misdemeanours. Misdemean "behave ill, conduct (oneself) improperly" is from French (and from mis- (2)), but it is attested only from 1560s and is too late to be the source of this word.

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caconym (n.)

"a name rejected for linguistic reasons, bad nomenclature in botany or biology," 1888, from caco- "bad, ill, poor" + -onym "name" (from PIE root *no-men- "name").

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huffy (adj.)
"puffed with pride or arrogance, ready to take offense," 1670s, from huff (n.) + -y (2). Related: Huffily; huffiness. Huffish "petulant, ill-humored" is from 1755.
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splotch (n.)
c. 1600, "a broad, ill-defined spot," perhaps a blend of spot, blot, and/or botch. Old English had splott "spot, blot; patch of land." Related: Splotchy; splotchiness.
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malady (n.)

"a physical disorder or disease," late 13c., maladie, from Old French maladie "sickness, illness, disease" (13c.), abstract noun from malade "ill" (12c.), from Late Latin male habitus "doing poorly, feeling sick," literally "ill-conditioned," from Latin male "badly" (see mal-) + habitus, past participle of habere "to have, hold" (from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive"). Extended sense of "moral or mental disorder, disordered state or condition" is from 14c. Related: Maladies.

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sickly (adj.)
late 14c., "ill, invalid, habitually ailing," from sick (adj.) + -ly (1). Meaning "causing sickness" in any sense is from c. 1600. Related: Sickliness.
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infamy (n.)
early 15c., "public disgrace, dishonor, evil fame," from Old French infamie "dishonor, infamous person" (14c.) and directly from Latin infamia "ill fame, bad repute, dishonor," from infamis "disreputable, notorious, of ill fame," from in- "not, without" (see in- (1)) + fama "reputation" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say"). Meaning "quality of being shamefully vile" is from 1510s.

An earlier form in Middle English was infame (late 14c.), from Old French infame, an earlier form of infamie. Infame also was the Middle English verb in this set, "brand with infamy," from Old French infamer, from Latin infamare "bring into ill repute, defame," from infamis. The verb has become archaic in English (infamize is attested from 1590s).
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Archilochian (adj.)
1751, of composition, "severe, ill-natured," literally "in the style of Archolochus" (Latinized from Greek Arkhilokos), famed poet and satirist of Paros (c. 700 B.C.E.). Also of his characteristic verse forms.
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cotquean (n.)

1540s (now obsolete), originally apparently "housewife of a cot," from cot "hut, peasant's hut" (see cottage) + quean "woman." "Thence the transition is easy on the one side to 'one who has the manners of a labourer's wife, rude, ill-mannered woman, vulgar bedlam, scold ...' and on the other to 'a man who acts the housewife.' " These senses -- "rude, ill-mannered woman" and "man who busies himself with affairs which properly belong to women" -- both are attested from 1590s. Related: Cotqueanity.

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