Etymology
Advertisement
keeping (n.)
"care, custody, charge," c. 1300, verbal noun from keep (v.). Phrase in keeping with "in harmony or agreement with" (1806) is from use of keeping in the jargon of painting to refer to a pleasing harmony of the elements of a picture (1715).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
pictograph (n.)

"pictorial symbol, picture or symbol representing an idea," 1851, from picto-, combining form of Latin pictus "painted," past participle of pingere "to paint" (see paint (v.)) + -graph "something written." First used in reference to American Indian writing. Related: Pictography; pictographic.

Related entries & more 
splice (v.)
1520s, originally a sailors' word, from Middle Dutch splissen "to splice" (Dutch splitsen), from Proto-Germanic *spli-, from PIE root *(s)plei- "to split, splice" (see flint). The Dutch word was borrowed in French as épisser. Used of motion picture film from 1912; of DNA from 1975. Related: Spliced; splicing; splicer.
Related entries & more 
telegenic (adj.)

1939, from television + ending from photogenic.

Judith Barrett, pretty and blonde actress, is the first Telegenic Girl to go on record. In other words, she is the perfect type of beauty for television. ... She is slated for the first television motion picture. [Baltimore Sun, Oct. 16, 1939]
Related entries & more 
daguerreotype (n.)

"picture taken with an early photographic process involving silver plates, iodine, and vapor of mercury," 1839, from French daguerreotype, coined from the name of the inventor, Louis J.M. Daguerre (1789-1851) + -type (see type (n.)). As a verb from 1839. Related: Daguerreotypist.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
imaginary (adj.)
"not real, existing only in fancy," late 14c., ymaginaire, from imagine + -ary; or else from Late Latin imaginarius "seeming, fancied," also literal, "pertaining to an image," from Latin imaginari "picture to oneself." Imaginary friend (one who does not exist) attested by 1789.
Related entries & more 
retake (v.)

mid-15c., "to take back," from re- "back, again" + take (v.). Meaning "to recapture" is recorded from 1640s; sense of "to record a second time" is attested from 1962. Related: Retook; retaking; retaken. As a noun, "action of filming a (motion picture) scene again," it is from 1918; figurative use from 1937.

Related entries & more 
studio (n.)
1819, "work-room of a sculptor or painter," usually one with windows to admit light from the sky, from Italian studio "room for study," from Latin studium (see study (v.)). Motion picture sense first recorded 1911; radio broadcasting sense 1922; television sense 1938. Studio apartment first recorded 1903.
Related entries & more 
portrait (n.)

1560s, "a figure, drawn or painted," a back formation from portraiture or directly from French portrait, from Old French portret (13c.), noun use of past participle of portraire "to paint, depict" (see portray). Especially a picture or representation of the head and face of a person drawn from life. Related: Portraitist.

Related entries & more 
rerun (v.)

also re-run, 1804, "to run (over) again," in reference to races, etc., from re- "back, again" + run (v.). Specifically as "to show (a motion picture, etc.) again" by 1962. The noun, in reference to film, is recorded from 1934; of television programs from 1955. Related: Reran; rerunning.

Related entries & more 

Page 5