Etymology
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forfend (v.)
also forefend, late 14c., "to protect; to prohibit; to avert, fend off, prevent," a hybrid from for- + fend "to ward off." Archaic, if not obsolete.
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semicolon (n.)
punctuation-mark, 1640s, a hybrid coined from Latin-derived semi- + Greek-based colon (n.1). The mark itself was (and is) in Greek the point of interrogation.
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lowboy (n.)
also low-boy, "chest of drawers on short legs," 1891, a hybrid from low (adj.) + French bois "wood" (see bush). Compare highboy.
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fibrosis (n.)
"fibrous growth or development in an organ," 1871, a Modern Latin hybrid, from Latin fibra "a fiber, filament" (see fiber) + Greek suffix -osis.
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nonagon (n.)

"plane figure with nine sides and nine angles," 1680s, a hybrid from Latin nonus "ninth" (from novem "nine;" see nine) + ending from pentagon, etc.

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fore-ordain (v.)
also foreordain, "arrange or plan beforehand," late 14c., probably modeled on Latin praeordinare; see fore- + ordain (v.). A hybrid word.
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oddity (n.)

1713, "odd characteristic or trait," a hybrid from odd + -ity. Meaning "odd person" is recorded by 1748; that of "something old or peculiar" is by 1834.

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freightage (n.)
1690s, "money paid for transporting," a hybrid word, from freight (n.) + -age. From 1803 as "freight, cargo." The older word was fraughtage (late 14c.).
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piscatology (n.)

"scientific study of fish, ichthyology," 1857, a jocular hybrid from Latin piscatus, past participle of piscari "to fish," from pisces "a fish" (from PIE root *pisk- "a fish") + -ology.

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highboy (n.)
also high-boy, "tall chest of drawers," 1891, American English (see tallboy); a hybrid, the second element is from French bois "wood" (see bush (n.)).
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