Etymology
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anthropic (adj.)

"pertaining to a human being," 1836, from Greek anthrōpikos "human; of or for a man," from anthrōpos "male human being, man" (see anthropo-). Related: Anthropical (1804).

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trivet (n.)

three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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humanly (adv.)

c. 1500, "humanely, courteously, kindly," from human (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "in a human manner" is from 1610s; meaning "within the range of human experience or power" is from 1580s.

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apodal (adj.)

"having no feet," 1769, with -al + Greek apous (genitive apodos) "footless," from a- "not, without" (see a- (3)) + pous "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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cap-a-pie (adj.)

"all over" (in reference to dress or armor), 1520s, from French cap-à-pie, literally "head to foot." The more usual French form is de pied en cap. The French words are from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head") + pedem "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").

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humanize (v.)

c. 1600, "make or render human," from human (adj.) + -ize. Meaning "civilize, make humane" is from 1640s. Also humanise. Related: Humanized; humanizing. Humanify "make human" is recorded from 1620s.

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pawn (n.2)

"lowly chess piece, a piece of the lowest rank and value in chess," late 14c., poune, from Anglo-French poun, Old French peon, earlier pehon "a foot-soldier; a pawn at chess," from Medieval Latin pedonem "foot soldier," from Late Latin pedonem (nominative pedo) "one going on foot," from Latin pes (genitive pedis) "foot," from PIE root *ped- "foot." The chess sense was in Old French by 13c. Figurative use, of persons, is by 1580s, but Middle English had rook and pawn "high and low persons," thus "everyone."

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dew claw (n.)

also dew-claw, "rudimentary inner toe of the foot, especially the hind foot, of some dogs," 1570s, from claw, but the signification of the first element is obscure (compare dewlap).

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unhuman (adj.)

1540s, "inhumane, cruel," from un- (1) "not" + human (adj.). Meaning "destitute of human qualities; superhuman" is from 1782.

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