Etymology
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eugenics (n.)

"doctrine of progress in evolution of the human race, race-culture," 1883, coined (along with adjective eugenic) by English scientist Francis Galton (1822-1911) on analogy of ethics, physics, etc. from Greek eugenes "well-born, of good stock, of noble race," from eu- "good" (see eu-) + genos "birth" (from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget").

The investigation of human eugenics, that is, of the conditions under which men of a high type are produced. [Galton, "Human Faculty," 1883]
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dehumanize (v.)

"deprive of distinctly human qualities," "1802, from de- + humanize. Related: Dehumanized; dehumanizing; dehumanization.

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anthropomorphize (v.)
"to invest with human qualities," 1834; see anthropomorphous + -ize. Related: Anthropomorphized; anthopomorphizing.
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anthropolatry (n.)

"worship of a human being," 1650s, from Greek anthrōpos "man, human" (see anthropo-) + latreia "hired labor, service, worship" (see -latry). The accusation was made by pagans against Christians and by Christians against pagans. The word figured in Church disputes about the nature of Christ.

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homunculus (n.)
"tiny human being produced artificially," 1650s, from Latin homunculus (plural homunculi), literally "little person," with -culus, diminutive suffix, + homo (genitive hominis), which technically meant "male human," but it also was used with a sense "the human race, mankind;" while in Vulgar Latin it could be used as "one, anyone, they, people" and in logical and scholastic writing as "a human being, person."

This is conjectured to be from PIE *(dh)ghomon- (source also of Old Irish duine, Welsh dyn, Breton den "man;" Old Prussian smunents, smunets "man;" Old Lithuanian žmuo "person," Lithuanian žmogus "man," žmones "people," Gothic guma, Old High German gomo, Old Norse gume, Old English guma "man"). The literal sense is "earthling," from PIE root *dhghem- "earth" (compare human (adj.)). Other Latin diminutives from homo included homullus, homuncio.
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symbiotic (adj.)
1882, in biology, from stem of symbiosis + -ic. Of human activities from 1951. Related: Symbiotical; symbiotically.
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pettitoes (n.)

1550s, "the toes or feet of a pig," especially as an article of food," from petit + toes. Sometimes in jocular use, "the human foot."

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anthropometry (n.)
"science of the measurement and dimensions of the parts of the human body," 1839, from anthropo- + -metry "a measuring of." Perhaps modeled on French anthropometrie (by 1806).
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man-stealer (n.)

also manstealer, "one who kidnaps human beings to sell into slavery," 1580s, from man (n. ) + agent noun from steal (v.).

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subculture (n.)
1886, in reference to bacterial cultures, from sub- + culture (n.). From 1922 in reference to human cultures.
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