Etymology
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keratin (n.)
basic substance of horns, nails, feathers, etc., 1848, from Greek keras (genitive keratos) "horn of an animal; horn as a substance" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head") + chemical suffix -in (2).
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ceratosaurus (n.)

meat-eating dinosaur of the Jurassic period, 1884, from cerato- "horn" + -saurus. So called for the small horn on its nose.

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cornet (n.)

c. 1400, "A wind instrument made of wood and provided with six finger holes" [Middle English Compendium], from Old French cornet (14c.) "a small horn," diminutive of corn "a horn," from Latin cornu "horn of an animal," also "a bugle horn," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

Modern use in reference to a brass instrument with valves is short for cornet-à-pistons "cornet with pistons" (1836, from French).

The quality of the tone is penetrating and unsympathetic, by no means equal to that of the trumpet, for which it is commonly substituted. [Century Dictionary, 1897]

Related: Cornettist.

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shofar (n.)
ram's horn blown on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, 1833, from Hebrew shophar "ram's horn," related to Arabic sawafiru "ram's horns," Akkadian shapparu "wild goat."
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cornea (n.)

"firm, transparent anterior part of the eyeball," late 14c., from Medieval Latin cornea tela "horny web or sheath," from Latin cornu (genitive cornus) "horn" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). So called for its consistency. Related: Corneal.

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quadricorn (adj.)

"having four horns," 1875; also, as a noun, "a four-horned animal or insect" (1848); see quadri- "four" + Latin cornus "horn" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head"). Alternative quadrucorn is older (c. 1600).

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unicorn (n.)

early 13c., from Old French unicorne, from Late Latin unicornus (Vulgate), from noun use of Latin unicornis (adj.) "having one horn," from uni- "one" (from PIE root *oi-no- "one, unique") + cornus "horn" (from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head").

The Late Latin word translates Greek monoceros, itself rendering Hebrew re'em (Deuteronomy xxxiii.17 and elsewhere), which probably was a kind of wild ox. According to Pliny, a creature with a horse's body, deer's head, elephant's feet, lion's tail, and one black horn two cubits long projecting from its forehead. Compare German Einhorn, Welsh ungorn, Breton uncorn, Old Church Slavonic ino-rogu. Old English used anhorn as a loan-translation of Latin unicornis.

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triceratops (n.)

dinosaur genus, 1890, from Greek trikeratos "three-horned" + ōps "face," etymologically "eye," from PIE root *okw- "to see." The first element is from tri- "three" (see three) + keras (genitive keratos) "horn of an animal," from PIE root *ker- (1) "horn; head."

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bugle (n.1)
"brass musical instrument," mid-14c., abbreviation of buglehorn "musical horn, hunting horn" (c. 1300), from Old French bugle "(musical) horn," also "wild ox, buffalo," from Latin buculus "heifer, young ox," diminutive of bos "ox, cow" (from PIE root *gwou- "ox, bull, cow"). Middle English also had the word in the "buffalo" sense and it survived in dialect with meaning "young bull." Modern French bugle is a 19c. borrowing from English.
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beep (interj.)
1927, imitative of automobile horns (originally of the sound of a certain type of automobile horn, one among several in the years after the klaxon horn first was brought into use c. 1910). Used as a noun and verb by 1929. Related: Beeped; beeping.
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