Etymology
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pseudodox (n.)

"false but common opinion, a vulgar error," 1610s, from Greek pseudodoxos "holding a false opinion," from pseudes "false" (see pseudo-) + doxa "opinion" (from dokein "to seem;" from PIE root *dek- "to take, accept"). Related: Pseudodoxal.

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matchbox (n.)

also match-box, 1786, "box for holding matches," from match (n.1) + box (n.). The line of metal toy cars (sold in small boxes that resembled matchboxes) by Lesney Products dates to 1953.

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bread-basket (n.)

1550s, "basket for holding bread," from bread (n.) + basket (n.). Slang meaning "belly, stomach" is attested from 1753, especially in pugilism. Another slang term for the belly was pudding-house (1590s).

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platter (n.)

"large, shallow dish for holding eatables," late 13c., platere, from Anglo-French plater, Old French plate "metal plate" (see plate (n.)). Especially a large plate on which meat is placed to be carved.

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grapnel (n.)
"small hook," especially one fixed on a rope and thrown for seizing and holding, late 14c., grapenel, from an assumed Anglo-French diminutive of grapon, from Old French grapil, grapin "hook," diminutive of grape "hook" (see grape). Earlier form was grapel (compare grapple (n.)).
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in (adj.)
"that is within, internal," 1590s, from in (adv.). Sense of "holding power" (the in party) first recorded c. 1600; that of "exclusive" (the in-crowd, an in-joke) is from 1907 (in-group); that of "stylish, fashionable" (the in thing) is from 1960.
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pillbox (n.)
also pill-box, "box for holding pills," 1730, from pill (n.) + box (n.). As a small round concrete machine gun nest, it came into use in World War I. As a type of hat, attested from 1958.
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washer (n.2)
"flat ring for sealing joints or holding nuts," mid-14c., generally considered an agent noun of wash (v.), but the sense connection is difficult, and the noun may derive instead from the ancestor of French vis "screw, vise" (see vise).
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priestcraft (n.)

late 15c., "business of being a priest, exercise of priestly functions," from priest + craft (n.). After rise of Protestantism and the Enlightenment, it acquired a pejorative sense of "arts and devices of ambitious priests for attaining and holding temporal power and social control" (1680s).

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cross-check (n.)

1903 in research and accounting, from the verbal phrase, from cross (adv.) + check (v.1). As a verb in hockey, "obstruct by holding one's stick across an opponent," from 1901; as a noun by 1968. Related: Cross-checked; cross-checking.

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