Etymology
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get-up (n.)
also getup, 1847, "equipment, costume," from get (v.) + up (adv.). Meaning "initiative, energy" recorded from 1841. The verbal phrase is recorded from mid-14c. as "to rise."
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lace-up (adj.)
1831, originally of boots, from the verbal phrase, from lace (v.) + up (adv.).
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leg up (n.)
"an aid, a boost," 1837, from leg (n.) + up (adv.).
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lead-up (n.)
1917, from verbal phrase; see lead (v.1) + up (adv.). To lead up to "prepare gradually for" is from 1861.
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lock-up (n.)
also lockup, "detention cell for offenders," 1838, perhaps short for earlier lock-up house; from the verbal phrase. Meaning "action of locking up" is from 1845. The verbal phrase lock (someone) up in a dwelling, prison, etc., is from early 15c. Of things, "to hold in safekeeping or concealment," also early 15c. See lock (v.) + up (adv.). To lock up (intransitive) "lock all the doors" (of a house, shop, etc.) is from 1901.
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moon-up (n.)

"moonrise," U.S. dialectal, 1907, from moon (n.) probably based on sun-up (q.v.).

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pick up (v.)

early 14c. as a verbal phrase, "lift and take with the fingers," from pick (v.) + up (adv.). From 1510s as "take or get casually, obtain or procure as opportunity offers." Meaning "take (a person found or overtaken) into a vehicle or vessel," is from 1690s, also, of persons, "make acquaintance or take along" (especially for sexual purposes). Intransitive meaning "improve gradually, reacquire vigor or strength" is by 1741. Sense of "tidy up" is from 1861; that of "arrest" is from 1871; meaning "gain speed" is from 1922; meaning "to pay" (a check, tab, etc.) is from 1945. Pick-me-up "stimulating alcoholic drink" is attested from 1867.

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pile-up (n.)

"multi-vehicle crash," 1929, from verbal phrase pile up "to heap up" (c. 1400), which is attested from 1849 as "to accumulate," 1899 as "to wreck in a heap" (see pile (v.)).

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up-and-down (adj.)
1610s, from adverbial phrase up and down (c. 1200); see up (adv.) + down (adv.).
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