Etymology
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muttonhead (n.)

"dull or stupid person," 1803, American English, from mutton + head (n.).

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dickhead (n.)

"stupid, contemptible person," by 1969, from dick in the "penis" sense + head (n.).

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headman (n.)
also head-man, "chief man, leader," Old English heafodman; see head (adj.) + man (n.). Cognate with German Hauptmann "captain."
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railhead (n.)

"furthest point reached by a railroad," by 1887, from rail (n.1) + head (n.).

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headache (n.)
Old English heafodece; see head (n.) + ache (n.). Colloquial sense of "troublesome problem" is first recorded 1934. Related: Headachy (1705).
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baldhead (n.)
"bald-headed man," 1530s, from bald + head (n.). Also baldpate (c. 1600).
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headstrong (adj.)
"determined to have one's way," late 14c., from head (n.) + strong. Compare Old English heafodbald "impudent," literally "head-bold." Strongheaded is attested from c. 1600.
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headquarters (n.)
"residence of a military commander," 1640s, from head (adj.) + quarters. Headquarter as a verb is recorded from 1838 (in Headquartered).
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thunderhead (n.)
"high-piled cumulus cloud," one likely to develop into a thunderstorm, 1861, from thunder (n.) + head (n.).
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headwaters (n.)
attested 1530s, then not again until 1792 (in descriptions of Kentucky), so possibly the modern word is a re-formation; see head (n.) "origin of a river" + water (n.1).
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