Etymology
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bifocal (adj.)
"having two foci," 1844; see bi- "two" + focal.
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angular (adj.)

1590s, "having an angle or angles, pointy," from Latin angularis "having corners or angles," from angulus "angle, corner" (see angle (n.)). It is attested earlier in an astrological sense, "occupying a cardinal point of the zodiac" (late 14c.). Angulous "having many corners" is from mid-15c. Angular as "measured by an angle" is from 1670s, hence angular motion "motion of a body which moves around a fixed point."

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Christless (adj.)

"having no faith in Christ, unchristian," 1650s, from Christ + -less.

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pointed (adj.)

c. 1300, "having a sharp end or ends," from point (n.). Meaning "having the quality of penetrating the feelings or mind" is from 1660s; that of "aimed at or expressly intended for some particular person" is by 1798. Related: Pointedly; pointedness.

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geniculate (adj.)
"having knots or joints; bent like a knee," 1660s, from Latin geniculatus "having knots, knotted," from geniculum "little knee, knot on the stalk of a plant," diminutive of genu "knee" (from PIE root *genu- (1) "knee; angle"). Related: Geniculation (1610s).
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hippy (adj.)
"having prominent hips," 1919, from hip (n.1) + -y (2).
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radiative (adj.)
"having a tendency to radiate," 1820, from radiate (v.) + -ive. Related: Radiativity.
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neckless (adj.)

"having no neck," c. 1600, from neck (n.) + -less.

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religionless (adj.)

"lacking or having lost religion," 1707, from religion + -less.

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hypotonic (adj.)
"having reduced tension or pressure," 1873, from hypo- + tonic.
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