Etymology
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flats (n.)
"level tidal tract," 1540s, from flat (n.) in the Middle English "level piece of ground" sense.
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grits (n.)
plural of grit "coarsely ground grain," Old English grytt (plural grytta) "coarse meal, groats, grits," from Proto-Germanic *grutja-, from the same root as grit (n.), the two words having influenced one another in sound development.

In American English, corn-based grits and hominy (q.v.) were used interchangeably in Colonial times. Later, hominy meant whole kernels that had been skinned but not ground, but in the U.S. South, hominy meant skinned kernels that could be ground coarsely to make grits. In New Orleans, whole kernels are big hominy and ground kernels little hominy.
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turf (v.)
early 15c., "to cover (ground) with turf," from turf (n.). Related: Turfed; turfing.
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graze (v.2)
"to touch lightly in passing," c. 1600, perhaps a transferred sense from graze (v.1) via a notion of cropping grass right down to the ground (compare German grasen "to feed on grass," used in military sense in reference to cannonballs that rebound off the ground). Related: Grazed; grazing. As a noun from 1690s, "an act of grazing."
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areal (adj.)
"pertaining to an area," 1670s, from Latin arealis, from area "level ground, open space" (see area).
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doorstep (n.)

also door-step, "threshold, step up from the ground to a door," 1810, from door + step (n.).

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soil (n.1)
c. 1300, originally "land, area, place," from Anglo-French soil "piece of ground, place" (13c.), from a merger or confusion of Old French sol "bottom, ground, soil" (12c., from Latin solum "soil, ground;" see sole (n.1)), Old French soeul, sueil "threshold, area, place" (from Latin solium "seat," from PIE *sodio- "seat," from PIE root *sed- (1) "to sit"), and Old French soil, soille "a miry place," from soillier (see soil (v.)).

Meaning "place of one's nativity" is from c. 1400. Meaning "mould, earth, dirt" (especially that which plants grow in) is attested from mid-15c.
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interment (n.)

"burial, the act of depositing in the ground," early 14c., from Old French enterrement "burial, interment," from enterrer (see inter (v.)).

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low (adv.)
"near the ground, not high," c. 1200, from low (adj.). Of voices or sounds, from c. 1300.
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seed-bed (n.)

"piece of ground prepared for receiving seed," 1650s, from seed (n.) + bed (n.) "garden plot." Figurative use is by 1826.

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