Etymology
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gruelling (adj.)
also grueling, "exhausting, punishing," 1852, present-participle adjective from gruel (v.) "to punish," from late 18c. slang get (or have) one's gruel "receive one's punishment," from gruel (n.).
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slim (v.)
1808, "to scamp one's work, do carelessly or superficially," from slim (adj.). Meaning "to make slim" (a garment, etc.) is from 1862; meaning "reduce (one's) weight" is from 1930. Related: Slimmed; slimming.
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hawk (v.3)
"to clear one's throat," 1580s, imitative.
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repatriate (v.)

"restore to one's own country," 1610s, from Late Latin repatriatus, past participle of repatriare "return to one's country," from re- "back" (see re-) + patria "native land" (see patriot). Related: Repatriated; repatriating.

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swami (n.)
1773, "Hindu idol," later, "Hindu religious teacher" (1901), from Hindi swami "master" (used as a term of address to a Brahmin), from Sanskrit svamin "lord, prince, master, (one's own) master," from sva-s "one's own" (from PIE *s(u)w-o- "one's own," from root *s(w)e-; see idiom) + amah "pressure, vehemence."
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sui generis 
1787, Latin, literally "of one's own kind, peculiar." First element from sui, genitive of suus "his, her, its, one's," from Old Latin sovos, from PIE root *swe-, pronoun of the third person (see idiom).
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spontaneous (adj.)
1650s, "occurring without external stimulus," from Late Latin spontaneus "willing, of one's free will," from Latin (sua) sponte "of one's own accord, willingly," a word of uncertain origin. Related: Spontaneously; spontaneousness. Used earlier of persons and characters, with a sense "acting of one's own accord" (c. 1200). Spontaneous combustion first attested 1795. Spontaneous generation (the phrase, not the feat) attested from 1650s.
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hoe (v.)
early 15c., "to clear weeds with a hoe," from hoe (n.). Tedious and toilsome work, hence a hard (or long) row to hoe "a difficult task;" hoe (one's) own row "tend to one's affairs." Related: Hoed; hoeing.
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self-perfection (n.)
"perfection of one's character or life," 1810, from self- + perfection.
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spite (v.)
c. 1400, "dislike, regard with ill will," from spite (n.). Meaning "treat maliciously" is from 1590s (as in "cut off (one's) nose to spite (one's) face"); earlier "fill with vexation, offend" (1560s). Related: Spited; spiting.
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