Etymology
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patriarchy (n.)

1560s, "ecclesiastical province under a patriarch; church government by patriarchs," from Latinized form of Greek patriarkhia, from patriarkhēs "male chief or head of a family" (see patriarch). Meaning "system of society or government by fathers or elder males of the community" is recorded from 1630s.

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episcopacy (n.)

1640s, "government of the church by bishops;" 1650s, "a bishop's period in office;" see episcopal + -cy.

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moneyocracy (n.)

1834, from money + -cracy "rule or government by." With connective -o-.

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administer (v.)
Origin and meaning of administer

late 14c., aministren, later administren, "to manage as a steward, control or regulate on behalf of others," from Old French aministrer "help, aid, be of service to" (12c., Modern French administrer), and directly from Latin administrare "to help, assist; manage, control, guide, superintend; rule, direct," from ad "to" (see ad-) + ministrare "to serve, attend, wait upon," from minister "inferior, servant, priest's assistant" (see minister (n.)).

The -d- was restored 14c.-16c. in French and after 15c. in English. In reference to punishment, justice, etc., "to dispense, bring into operation" (especially as an officer), from mid-15c. In reference to medicines, medical treatment, etc., "to give," from 1540s. Related: Administered; administering.

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terr (n.)

Rhodesian slang abbreviation of terrorist, 1976, used in reference to guerrilla fighting against white minority government.

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consulate (n.)

late 14c., "government of Rome by the consuls," from Latin consulatus "office of a consul," from consul (see consul). Also used in reference to the consular government of France from 1799-1804. In reference to the office of a modern consul in international law, from 1702 (earlier in this sense was consulship, 1610s).

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Oklahoma 

state in southwestern U.S., from Choctaw (Muskogean), literally "red people," from okla "nation, people" + homma "red." Coined by Choctaw scholar and Presbyterian minister Allen Wright (1826-1885), later principal chief of the Choctaw Nation, and first used in the Choctaw-Chickasaw treaty of April 28, 1866. Organized as a U.S. territory 1889; admitted as a state 1907. Related: Oklahoman.

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regime (n.)

"system of government or rule, mode of management," 1792, from French régime, from Old French regimen (14c.), from Latin regimen "rule, guidance, government, means of guidance, rudder," from regere "to direct, to guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").

Earlier "course of diet, exercise" (late 15c.), a sense now pertaining to regimen (q.v.). In French, l'ancien régime refers to the system of government which prevailed before the revolution of 1789.

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incent (v.)

by 1992, U.S. government-speak, a back-formation from incentive. Related: Incented; incenting. Compare incentivize.

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monarchism (n.)

"the principle of monarchical government; preference for monarchy," by 1791, from French monarchisme, from monarchie (see monarchy).

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