Etymology
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Oswald 
masc. proper name, from Old English Osweald "god-power, god-ruler," from Old English os "god" (only in personal names), from PIE *ansu- "spirit" (see Oscar) + Old English (ge)weald "power."
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divinity (n.)

c. 1300, "science of divine things, theology;" late 14c., "quality or character of being divine," also "a divine being, God," from Old French devinité (12c.), from Latin divinitatem (nominative divinitas), from divinus "of a god," from divus "of or belonging to a god, inspired, prophetic," related to deus "god, deity" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god"). Figurative meaning "that which is divine in character or quality" is from 1640s.

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Hare Krishna (adj.)
1970, from the title of a Hindu chant or mantra, from Hindi hare "O God!" + Krishna, name of an incarnation of the god Vishnu.
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deicide (n.)

1610s, "the killing of a god;" 1650s, "one who kills a god," from stem of Latin deus "god" (see Zeus) + -cida "slayer," from caedere "to kill, to cut down" (from PIE root *kae-id- "to strike").

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Nathaniel 

masc. proper name, from Late Latin Nathanael, from Greek Nathanael, from Hebrew (Semitic) Nethan'el, literally "God has given," from nathan (see Nathan) + El "God."

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teocalli (n.)
place of worship of ancient Mexicans, 1570s, from American Spanish, from Nahuatl (Aztecan) teohcalli "temple, church," literally "god-house," from teotl "god" + calli "house."
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divine (n.)

c. 1300, "soothsayer, sorcerer, astrologer," from Old French devin "soothsayer; theologian" and directly from Latin divinus, "soothsayer, augur," noun use of an adjective meaning "of or belonging to a god," from divus "of or belonging to a god, inspired, prophetic," related to deus "god, deity" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god").

Meaning "ecclesiastic, theologian, man skilled in divinity" is from late 14c. Sense of "divine nature, divineness" is from late 14c.

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deify (v.)

mid-14c., deifien, "to make god-like;" late 14c., "make a god of, exalt to the rank of a deity," from Old French deifier (13c.), from Late Latin deificare, from deificus "making godlike," from Latin deus "god" (from PIE root *dyeu- "to shine," in derivatives "sky, heaven, god") + -ficare, combining form of facere "to make, do" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Sense of "adore, regard as an object worthy of worship" is from 1580s. Related: Deified; deifying.

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adieu (interj.)

late 14c., adewe, from Old French a Dieu, a Deu, shortened from phrases such as a dieu (vous) commant "I commend (you) to God," from a "to" (see ad-) + dieu "God," from Latin deum, accusative of deus "god" (from PIE *deiwos "god" (from root *dyeu- "to shine").

Originally it was said to the party left (farewell was to the party setting forth), but in English it came to be used as a general parting salutation. As a noun, "expression of kind wishes upon departure," late 14c. Compare the native parting salutation good-bye, a contraction of God be with ye.

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theist (n.)
1660s, from Greek theos "god" (from PIE root *dhes-, forming words for religious concepts) + -ist. The original senses was that later reserved to deist: "one who believes in a transcendent god but denies revelation." Later in 18c. theist was contrasted with deist, as believing in a personal God and allowing the possibility of revelation.
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