Etymology
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exit (n.)

1530s (late 15c. as a Latin word in English), originally a stage direction, from Latin exit "he or she goes out," third person singular present indicative of exire "go out, go forth, depart," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + ire "to go" (from PIE root *ei- "to go"). Also from Latin exitus "a leaving, a going out," noun of action from exire.

Meaning "a departure" (originally from the stage) is from 1580s. Meaning "a way of departure" is from 1690s; specific meaning "door for leaving" is from 1786. The verb is c. 1600, from the noun; it ought to be left to stage directions and the clunky jargon of police reports. Related: Exited; exiting.

Those who neither know Latin nor read plays are apt to forget or not know that this is a singular verb with plural exeunt. [Fowler]

Exit poll attested by 1980.

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henceforth (adv.)
late 14c., earlier henne forth (late Old English); see hence + forth.
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wiggle (v.)
early 13c., perhaps from Middle Dutch, Middle Low German, or Middle Flemish wigelen, frequentative of wiegen "to rock, wag, move back and forth," from wiege "cradle," from Proto-Germanic *wig- (source also of Old High German wiga, German Wiege "cradle," Old Frisian widze), from PIE root *wegh- "to go, move, transport in a vehicle." Related: Wiggled; wiggling. The noun is attested from 1816.
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aphetic (adj.)

1880, "suggested by the Editor" (OED editor Sir James A.H. Murray) for "gradual and unintentional loss of a short unaccented vowel at the beginning of a word" [OED], as squire from esquire, venture from adventure. With -ic + aphesis (1880), from Greek aphienai "to let go, to send forth," from assimilated form of apo "from" (see apo-) + hienai "to send, throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Compare apheresis.

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compromise (n.)
Origin and meaning of compromise

early 15c., "a joint promise to abide by an arbiter's decision," from Old French compromis (13c.), from Late Latin compromissus, past participle of compromittere "to make a mutual promise" (to abide by the arbiter's decision), from com "with, together" (see com-) + promittere "to send forth; let go; foretell; assure beforehand, promise," from pro "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

The sense of "a coming to terms, a settlement of differences by mutual concessions" (mid-15c.) is from extension to the settlement itself. The meaning "that which results from such an agreement" is from 1510s.

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ply (v.1)

"work with, practice with persistence, use or employ diligently," late 14c., shortened form of applien "join to, apply" (see apply). The core of this is Latin plicare "to lay, fold, twist," from Proto-Italic *plekt-, from PIE root *plek- "to plait." The sense of "travel regularly, go back and forth over the same course" is attested from 1803, perhaps from earlier sense "steer a course" (1550s). Related: Plied; plies; plying.

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viviparous (adj.)

1640s, from Late Latin viviparus "bringing forth alive," from Latin vivus "alive, living" (from PIE root *gwei- "to live") + parire "bring forth, bear" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, bring forth"). See viper.

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promise (n.)

c. 1400, promisse, "a solemn pledge; a vow; a declaration in reference to the future made by one person to another, assuring the latter that the former will do, or not do, a specified act," from Old French promesse "promise, guarantee, assurance" (13c.) and directly from Latin promissum "a promise," noun use of neuter past participle of promittere "send forth; let go; foretell; assure beforehand, promise," from pro "before" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before") + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission).

Sense of "that which affords a basis for hope or expectation of future excellence or distinction" is by 1530s.

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biparous (adj.)

"bringing forth two at birth," 1731, from bi- "two" + Latin -parus, from parire "bring forth, bear" (from PIE root *pere- (1) "to produce, procure").

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