Etymology
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proceed (v.)

late 14c., proceden, "to go, go on, move in a certain direction, go about one's business," also "to emanate from, result from; to issue or come, as from an origin or course," from Old French proceder (13c., Modern French procéder) and directly from Latin procedere (past participle processus) "go before, go forward, advance, make progress; come forward," from pro "forward" (from PIE root *per- (1) "forward") + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Related: Proceeded; proceeding.

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forgo (v.)
"refrain from," Old English forgan "abstain from, leave undone, neglect," also "go or pass over, go away," from for- "away" + gan "go" (see go (v.)). Often, but less properly, forego. Related: Forgoing; forgone.
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comorbidity (n.)
1985, from co- "along with" + morbidity "diseased condition." Comorbid (adj.) is a 1990 back-formation.
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herewith (adv.)
"along with this," late Old English herwið; see here + with.
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downrange (adv.)

"along the course of a missile, spacecraft, etc.," 1952, from down (adv.) + range (n.).

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vamoose (v.)

"to decamp, be off," 1834, from Spanish vamos "let us go," from Latin vadamus, first person plural indicative or subjunctive of vadere "to go, to walk, go hastily," from PIE root *wadh- (2) "to go" (source also of Old English wadan "to go," Latin vadum "ford;" see wade (v.)).

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nautilus (n.)

marine cephalopod, c. 1600, from Latin nautilus, in Pliny a kind of marine snail (including also squid, cuttlefish, polyps, etc.), from Greek nautilos "paper nautilus," literally "sailor," a poetic form of nautēs "sailor," from naus "ship" (from PIE root *nau- "boat"). From Aristotle into the 19c., the nautilus was believed to use its webbed arms to sail along the surface of the sea, hence the name.

For thus to man the voice of nature spake,
Go, from the creatures thy instruction take,
Learn of the little Nautilus to sail,
Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale
[Pope ]
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cata- 

word-forming element meaning "down, downward," but also "through, on, against, concerning," etc., from Latinized form of Greek kata-, before vowels kat-, from kata "down, downward, down from, down to," from PIE *kmt- "down, with, along" (source also of Hittite kattan (adv.) "below, underneath," katta "along with"). Occasionally in Greek it had senses of "against" (catapult) or "wrongly" (catachresis), also "along, through, over, across, concerning." Also sometimes used as an intensive or with a sense of completion of action (catalogue). Very active in ancient Greek, this prefix is found in English mostly in words borrowed through Latin after c. 1500.

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longshoreman (n.)
"stevedore, one whose work is loading and unloading ships," 1811, from shortening of alongshore "existing or employed along a shore or coast" + man (n.).
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kart (n.)
1957, American English, short for go-kart (see go-cart).
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