Etymology
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sextuplet (n.)

1852, "union or combination of six things," from adjective sextuple "sixfold," patterned on triplet, etc. The meaning in music, "group of six notes to be performed in the time of four" (a double triplet) is by 1876; earlier in the same sense were sextole, sextolet (1854).

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deepness (n.)

Old English deopnes "deep water," also "a mystery or secret;" see deep (adj.) + -ness. From late 12c. as "distance downward;" c. 1200 as "wisdom, profundity."

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parsec (n.)

interstellar distance measure, 1913, from first elements of parallax second. It is the distance at which an object has parallax (viewed from Earth at an interval of six months and halved) of one second of arc, or about 3.26 light-years.

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futhorc (n.)

1851, historians' name for the Germanic runic alphabet; so called from its first six letters (th being a single rune), on the model of alphabet.

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sextillion (n.)

1680s, from Latin sext-, combining form of sex "six" (see six) + ending from million. Compare billion. In English, and originally Italian, numeration, 1 to the 6th power (one followed by thirty-six zeroes); in French and U.S. use, 1,000 to the 7th power (one followed by twenty-one zeroes). Related: Sextillionth.

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back (adv.)

"to or toward the rear or the original starting place; in the past; behind in position," literally or figuratively, late 14c., shortened from abak, from Old English on bæc "backwards, behind, aback" (see back (n.), and compare aback). To give (something) back is to give it again, to give it in the opposite direction to that in which it was formerly given. Adverbial phrase back and forth is attested by 1814.

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bathukolpian (adj.)

also bathycolpian, etc., "big-breasted," 1825, from Greek bathykolpos "with full breasts," literally "deep-bosomed," from bathys "deep" (see benthos) + kolpos "breast" (see gulf (n.)). With -ian.

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sice (n.)

"a roll of 6 in dice," late 14c., from Old French sis, from Latin sex (see six).

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chimichanga (n.)

"deep-fried burrito," by 1964; the thing and the name for it seem to have originated somewhere along the western U.S.-Mexico border (Arizona, Sonora). The name is said to mean "trinket" in Mexican Spanish.

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sestina (n.)

type of poem in fixed form, 1797, from Italian, "poem of six-lined stanzas," from sesto "sixth," from Latin sextus (see six). Invented by 12c. Provençal troubadour Arnaut Daniel. The line-endings of the first stanza are repeated in different order in the rest, and in an envoi.

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