Etymology
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compliment (v.)

1610s, "pay a compliment to, flatter or gratify by expression of admiration, respect, etc.," from French complimenter, from compliment (see compliment (n.)). By 1690s as "manifest kindness or regard for by a gift or favor." Related: Complimented; complimenting.

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honorarium (n.)
"fee for services rendered by a professional person such as a physician, barrister, etc.; honorary reward," 1650s, from Latin honorarium (donum), literally "honorary (gift)," but in Latin meaning "bribe paid to get appointed to an honorary post," neuter of adjective honorarius "for the sake of honor," from honos (see honor (n.)).
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blessing (n.)
Old English bletsunga, bledsunge, verbal noun from bless. Meaning "a gift from God, temporal or spiritual benefit" is from mid-14c. In sense of "religious invocation before a meal" it is recorded from 1738. Phrase blessing in disguise is recorded from 1746.
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oblation (n.)

c. 1400, oblacioun, "an offering to a deity; a public ceremony of offering sacrifice; that which is sacrificed or solemnly offered to God," from Old French oblacion "offering, pious donation" and directly from Latin oblationem (nominative oblatio) "an offering, presenting, gift," in Late Latin "sacrifice," from Latin oblatus (see oblate (n.)). Related: Oblational; oblationary.

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remuneration (n.)

c. 1400, remuneracioun, "reward, recompense, payment," from Old French remuneracion and directly from Latin remunerationem (nominative remuneratio) "a repaying, recompense," noun of action from past-participle stem of remunerari "to pay, reward," from re- "back" (see re-) + munerari "to give," from munus (genitive muneris) "gift, office, duty" (see municipal).

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eloquence (n.)

late 14c., from Old French eloquence (12c.), from Latin eloquentia, from eloquentem (nominative eloquens) "eloquent," present participle of eloqui "speak out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Earlier in same sense was eloquency (mid-14c.).

Eloquence is a word which has been made the expression for the highest power of speech in producing the effect desired, especially if the desire be to move the feelings or the will. Many efforts have been made to define eloquence, some regarding it as a gift and some as an art. "It is a gift of the soul, which makes us masters of the minds and hearts of others." (La Bruyère.) [Century Dictionary]
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present (v.)

c. 1300, presenten, "bring into the presence of, introduce (someone or something) formally or ceremonially;" also "make a formal presentation of; give as a gift or award; bestow; approach with a gift, bring or lay before one for acceptance," from Old French presenter (11c., Modern French présenter) and directly from Latin praesentare "to place before, show, exhibit," from stem of praesens (see present (adj.)).

From late 14c. as "exhibit (something), demonstrate, reveal, offer for inspection, display;" also, in law, "accuse to the authorities, make a formal complaint or charge of wrongdoing." From c. 1400 as "represent, portray." Related: Presented; presenting. To present arms "bring the firearm to a perpendicular position in front of the body" is by 1759.

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loan (n.)
late 12c., "that which is lent or owning, a thing furnished on promise of future return," also "a gift or reward from a superior, a gift of God," from Old Norse lan "loan," from Proto-Germanic *laikhwniz (source also of Old Frisian len "thing lent," Middle Dutch lene, Dutch leen "loan, fief," Old High German lehan, German Lehn "fief, feudal tenure"), originally "to let have, to leave (to someone)," from PIE *loikw-nes-, suffixed form of root *leikw- "to leave."

The Norse word also is cognate with Old English læn "gift," which according to OED did not survive into Middle English, but its derived verb lænan is the source of lend (v.). From early 15c. as "a contribution to public finances" (ostensibly voluntary but often coerced; sometimes repaid, sometimes not). As a verb, loan is attested from 1540s, perhaps earlier, and formerly was current, but it has now been supplanted in England by lend, though it survives in American English. Slang loan shark first attested 1900 (see shark (n.)).
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munificent (adj.)

"very liberal in giving or bestowing," 1580s, back-formation from munificence, or else from Latin munificent-, stem of munificus "bountiful, liberal, generous," literally "present-making," from munus "gift or service; function, task, duty, office" (see municipal). Latin munificare meant "to enrich." Related: Munificently.

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Donatist (n.)

mid-14c., "adherent of a heretical Christian sect in 4c. North Africa," from Medieval Latin Donatista, from Donatus name of two of the principal men in it. The schism had more to do with episcopal succession in Carthage than with doctrine. The name is literally "bestowed, given," from past participle of Latin from donare "give as a gift" (from PIE root *do- "to give"). Related: Donatism.

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