Etymology
Advertisement
entrain (v.2)
"get on board a locomotive train," 1860s, from en- (1) "in, into" + train (n.). Related: Entrained.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
panic (v.)
1827, "to afflict with panic," from panic (n.). Intransitive sense of "to lose one's head, get into a panic" is from 1902. Related: Panicked; panicking.
Related entries & more 
niblick (n.)

"small, narrow-headed iron golf club," used to get the ball out of ruts or other bad places, 1857, of obscure origin.

Related entries & more 
agglomeration (n.)

1774, "action of collecting in a mass," from Latin agglomerationem (nominative agglomeratio), noun of action from past-participle stem of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball, ball of yarn, ball-shaped mass," which is of uncertain origin (see glebe). In reference to a mass so formed, it is recorded from 1833.

Related entries & more 
andiron (n.)
"fire-dog, one of the pair of metallic stands used to support wood burned on an open hearth," c. 1300, from Old French andier "andiron," which is of unknown origin, perhaps from Gaulish *andero- "a young bull" (source also of Welsh anner "heifer"), which would make sense if they once had bull's heads cast onto them. Altered by influence of Middle English iren (see iron (n.)).
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
acquire (v.)
"to get or gain, obtain," mid-15c., acqueren, from Old French aquerre "acquire, gain, earn, procure" (12c., Modern French acquérir), from Vulgar Latin *acquaerere, corresponding to Latin acquirere/adquirere "to get in addition to, accumulate, gain," from ad "to," here perhaps emphatic (see ad-), + quaerere "to seek to obtain" (see query (v.)). Reborrowed in current form from Latin c. 1600. Related: Acquired; acquiring.
Related entries & more 
recuperation (n.)

late 15c., "recovery or regaining of things, recovery as of something lost" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin recuperationem (nominative recuperatio) "a getting back, regaining, recovery," noun of action from past-participle stem of recuperare "get back, regain, get again," in Medieval Latin "revive, convalesce, recover," which is related to or a variant of recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive). Meaning "restoration to health or vigor" is from 1865.

Related entries & more 
go-getter (n.)
1910, American English, from go + agent noun from get (v.). Goer, with essentially the same meaning, is attested from late 14c.
Related entries & more 
contact (v.)

1834, "to bring together or put in contact," from contact (n.). Meaning "get in touch with" is 1927, American English. Related: Contacted; contacting.

Related entries & more 
-phage 
word-forming element meaning "eater," from stem of Greek phagein "to eat," from PIE root *bhag- "to share out, apportion; to get a share."
Related entries & more 

Page 5