Etymology
Advertisement
Lycoperdon 
fungus genus established 1700 (Tournefort) for the "puffball" mushrooms, from Latinized form of Greek lykos "wolf" (see wolf (n.)) + perdesthai "to break wind," from PIE imitative root *perd-.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
citrus (adj.)

any tree of the genus Citrus, or its fruit, 1825, from the Modern Latin genus name, from Latin citrus "citron tree," the name of an African tree with aromatic wood and lemon-like fruit, the first citrus fruit to become available in the West. The name, like the tree, is probably of Asiatic origin [OED] or from a lost non-IE Mediterranean language [de Vaan]. But Klein and others trace it to Greek kedros "cedar," perhaps via Etruscan (a suggested by the change of -dr- to -tr-).

Related entries & more 
Dianthus (n.)

large genus of flowering plants including carnations, 1849, from Modern Latin (Linnaeus), literally "flower of Zeus," from Greek Dios, genitive of Zeus "Zeus" (see Zeus) + anthos "flower" (see anther).

Related entries & more 
naissance (n.)

"birth, origin," late 15c. (Caxton), from French naissance "birth, parentage, place of origin" (12c.), present participle of naître, from Gallo-Roman *nascere, from Latin nasci "be born" (see genus).

Related entries & more 
drosophila (n.)

scientific name of the fruit fly, 1829, the genus name, from Modern Latin (Fallén, 1823), from Greek drosos "dew" (which Beekes says is "probably of Pre-Greek origin") + philos "loving" (see -phile).

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
-idae 
word-forming element used to coin family names in zoology (by being suffixed to the name of the genus whence that of the family is derived), from Latin -idae, plural of noun suffix -ides (see -id).
Related entries & more 
Eohippus (n.)
oldest known genus of the horse family, about the size of a fox and first known from fossil remains found in New Mexico, 1879, Modern Latin, from eo- "earliest" + Greek hippos "horse" (from PIE root *ekwo- "horse").
Related entries & more 
merganser (n.)

genus of duck-like water birds of the northern hemisphere, 1752, coined in Modern Latin (1550s), from Latin mergus "waterfowl, diver" (from mergere "to dip, immerse;" see merge (v.)) + anser "goose" (see goose (n.)).

Related entries & more 
naissant (adj.)

"newly born or about to be born; rising or coming forth," originally a term in heraldry, 1570s, from French naissant, present participle of naître, from Gallo-Roman *nascere, from Latin nasci "be born" (see genus).

Related entries & more 
hydrocephalus (n.)

"accumulation of fluid in the cranial cavity, 'water on the brain,'" 1660s, medical Latin, from Greek hydro- "water" (see water (n.1)) + kephalē "head" (see cephalo-). Also the name of a trilobite genus. Related: Hydrocephalic; hydrocephalous.

Related entries & more 

Page 5