Etymology
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identity (n.)
Origin and meaning of identity

c. 1600, "sameness, oneness, state of being the same," from French identité (14c.), from Medieval Latin identitatem (nominative identitas) "sameness," ultimately from Latin idem (neuter) "the same" (see idem). [For discussion of Latin formation, see entry in OED.] Earlier form of the word in English was idemptitie (1560s), from Medieval Latin idemptitas. Term identity crisis first recorded 1954. Identity theft attested from 1995. Identity politics is attested by 1987.

"[I]dentity politics" [is] a phrase with notably wide currency in gay and lesbian communities. In common usage, the term identity politics refers to the tendency to base one's politics on a sense of personal identity—as gay, as Jewish, as Black, as female ..... [Diana Fuss, "Essentially Speaking," 1989]
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cadenza (n.)
"ornamental passage near the close of a song or solo," 1780, from Italian cadenza "conclusion of a movement in music" (see cadence (n.)).
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standstill (n.)
"state of cessation of movement," 1702, from stand (v.) + still (adv.). Earlier the notion would have been expressed simply by stand.
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spiral (n.)
1650s, from spiral (adj.). U.S. football sense is from 1896. Figurative sense of "progressive movement in one direction" is by 1897. Of books, spiral-bound (adj.) is from 1937.
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naturist (n.)

"participant in the movement for communal nudity," 1929, from nature + -ist. Earlier in other senses, including "naturalist" and "a physician who trusts entirely to nature for a cure" (1851). Related: Naturistic; naturism.

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Pietism (n.)

1690s, in reference to a specific religious movement, Pietism, from German Pietismus, originally applied in derision to the movement to revive personal piety in the Lutheran Church, begun in Frankfurt c. 1670 by Philipp Jakob Spener (1635-1705). See piety + -ism. With lower-case p- and in reference generally to devotion, godliness of life (as distinguished from mere intellectual orthodoxy), by 1829.

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earthquake (n.)

"movement or vibration of a part of the earth's crust," late 13c., eorthequakynge, from earth + quake (n.). In this sense Old English had eorðdyn, eorðhrernes, eorðbeofung, eorðstyrung.

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swinging (adj.)
1550s, "moving to and fro," present-participle adjective from swing (v.). Meaning "marked by a free, sweeping movement" is from 1818. Sense of "uninhibited" is from 1958.
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eurythmic (adj.)

also eurhythmic, "harmonious," 1831, from Greek eurythmia "rhythmical order," from eurythmos "rhythmical, well-proportioned," from eu "well, good" (see eu-) + rhythmos "measured flow or movement, rhythm; proportion, symmetry" (see rhythm). Related: Eurythmics (also eurhythmics), "system of rhythmical body movement to music, used as therapy or to teach musical understanding," developed by Swiss music educator Émile Jaques-Dalcroze; eurythmy.

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motility (n.)

"capacity of automatic or spontaneous movement," 1827, from French motilité (1827), from Latin mot-, stem of movere "to move" (from PIE root *meue- "to push away").

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