Etymology
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bridge (n.2)
card game, 1886 (perhaps as early as 1843), an alteration of biritch, but the source and meaning of that are obscure. "Probably of Levantine origin, since some form of the game appears to have been long known in the Near East" [OED]. One guess is that it represents Turkish *bir-üç "one-three," because one hand is exposed and three are concealed. The game also was known early as Russian whist (attested in English from 1839).
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shinny (n.)

also shinney, name of a hockey-like game, bandy-ball, 1670s, Scottish English, a word of obscure origin. Perhaps it is from Gaelic sinteag "a bound, a leap." OED suggests origin from shin ye "the cry used in the game." The form shinty is attested by 1771.

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curling (n.)

"action of turning, bending, or forming into ringlets," mid-15c., verbal noun from curl (v.). Curling-iron "rod of iron to be used hot for curling the hair" is from 1630s.

The game played with stones on ice, originally Scottish, is so-called by 1610s, but the sense connection is obscure. "The name appears to describe the motion given to the stone" [OED]. Evidence of the sport dates to the early 16c. in Scotland; written accounts of the game date to the 1540s. A similar game is described from c. 1600 in Flanders.

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quoits (n.)

"game played by throwing quoits," late 14c., coytes; see quoit.

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kick-ball (n.)
also kickball, children's game, 1854; see kick (v.) + ball (n.1).
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craps (n.)

game of chance played with dice, 1843, American English, unrelated to the term for excrement, instead it is from Louisiana French craps "the game of hazard," from an 18c. continental French corruption of English crabs, which was 18c. slang for "a throw of two or three" (the lowest throw), which perhaps is from crab (n.2), the sense in crab apple. The 1843 citation (in an anti-gambling publication, "An Exposure of the Arts and Miseries of Gambling") calls it "a game lately introduced into New Orleans." To shoot craps is by 1885.

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Yahtzee (n.)
dice game, 1957, proprietary (E.S. Lowe Co., N.Y.), apparently based on yacht.
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scorer (n.)

late 14c., "one who or that which makes notches," agent noun from score (v.). By 1732 as "one who keeps record of a score" (in a match or game), by 1884 as "one who makes a score" in a match or game.

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cross-purpose (n.)

1680s, "an opposing or counter purpose, a conflicting intention or plan," from cross- + purpose (n.). It is attested earlier as the name of a popular parlor game (1660s), and the phrase be at cross-purposes "have conflicting plans to attain the same end" (1680s) might be from the game.

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venison (n.)
c. 1300, from Old French venesoun "meat of large game," especially deer or boar, also "a hunt," from Latin venationem (nominative venatio) "a hunt, hunting, the chase," also "game as the product of the hunt," from venatus, past participle of venari "to hunt, pursue," probably from PIE *wen-a-, from root *wen- (1) "to desire, strive for."
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