Etymology
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dining (n.)

c. 1400, "feasting, a feast," verbal noun from dine (v.). Dining-room "room in which principal meals are eaten" is attested from c. 1600. The railroad dining-car is from 1838.

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overpark (v.)

also over-park, "to park (a car, etc.) longer than permitted," 1938, American English, from over- + park (v.). Related: Overparked; overparking.

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MG 

British sports car manufacturer, 1923; it stands for Morris Garages, which was founded by William R. Morris (1877-1963).

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*aik- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "be master of, possess." 

It forms all or part of: fraught; freight; ought (v.); owe; own.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit ise, iste "he owns, rules," isvara- "owner, lord, ruler;" Avestan ise, is "ruler over," isti- "property, power;" Old English agan "to have, own."

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Avis 

U.S. car rental company, according to company history founded 1946 at Willow Run Airport in Detroit by U.S. businessman Warren Avis and named for him.

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trannie (n.)
also tranny "transsexual person," 1983, from transsexual + -ie. In 1960s and '70s the word was used as a slang shortening of transistor radio and in car magazines for transmission.
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fraught (adj.)

late 14c., "freighted, laden, loaded, stored with supplies" (of vessels); figurative use from early 15c.; past-participle adjective from obsolete verb fraught "to load (a ship) with cargo," Middle English fraughten (c. 1400), which always was rarer than the past participle, from noun fraught "a load, cargo, lading of a ship" (early 13c.), which is the older form of freight (n.).

This apparently is from a North Sea Germanic source, Middle Dutch vrecht, vracht "hire for a ship, freight," or similar words in Middle Low German or Frisian, apparently originally "earnings," from Proto-Germanic *fra-aihtiz "property, absolute possession," from *fra-, here probably intensive + *aigan "be master of, possess" (from PIE root *aik- "be master of, possess"). Related: Fraughtage.

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total (v.)
1716, "bring to a total," from total (n.). Intransitive sense "reach a total of" is from 1859. Meaning "to destroy one's car" first recorded 1954. Related: Totaled; totaling.
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sidetrack (n.)
also side-track, "railway siding," 1835, from side (adj.) + track (n.). The verb meaning "to move (a train car) onto a sidetrack" is from 1874; figurative sense of "to divert from the main purpose" is attested from 1881. Related: Sidetracked.
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dragster (n.)

"hot rod or constructed car designed for maximum engine efficiency with no regard for style," 1954, from drag (n.) in the racing sense + -ster, perhaps abstracted from roadster.

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