Etymology
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libre (adj.)
"free," a French word used in various combinations in English since 16c., from French libre, from Latin liber "free" (see liberal (adj.)).
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unloose (v.)
mid-14c., "relax;" late 14c., "to set free," from un- (2), used here emphatically, + loose (v.). Old English had unliesan "unloose, set free." Related: Unloosed; unloosing.
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liberator (n.)
1640s, from Latin liberator "one who sets free, a deliverer" (source also of French libérateur, Spanish liberador, Italian liberatore), agent noun from past participle stem of liberare "to set free" (see liberate).
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franc-tireur (n.)
"sharpshooter of the irregular infantry," 1808, French, literally "free-shooter," from franc "free" (see frank (adj.)) + tireur "shooter," from tirer "to draw, shoot" (see tirade). A term from the French Revolution.
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lobe (n.)
early 15c., "a lobe of the liver or lungs," from Medieval Latin lobus "a lobe," from Late Latin lobus "hull, husk, pod," from Greek lobos "lobe, lap, slip; vegetable pod," used of lap- or slip-like parts of the body or plants, especially "earlobe," but also of lobes of the liver or lungs, a word of unknown origin. It is perhaps related to Greek leberis "husk of fruits," from PIE *logwos. Beekes writes that the proposed connection with the PIE source of English lap (n.1)) "is semantically attractive." Extended 1670s to divisions of the brain; 1889 to ice sheets. The common notion is "rounded protruding part."
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comped (adj.)
"given or admitted free," 1960s, see comp.
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quit (adj.)

c. 1200, "excused, exempt, free, clear" (of debt, obligation, penalty, etc.), from Old French quite, quitte "free, clear, entire, at liberty; discharged; unmarried," and directly from Medieval Latin quitus, quittus, from Latin quietus "free" (in Medieval Latin "free from war, debts, etc."), also "calm, resting" (from PIE root *kweie- "to rest, be quiet").

From mid-13c. as "deprived of." From c. 1300 of real property, "exempt from taxes or other dues or claims."

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footloose (adj.)
1690s, "free to move the feet, unshackled," from foot (n.) + loose (adj.). Figurative sense of "free to act as one pleases" is from 1873.
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deliver (v.)

c. 1200, deliveren, "save, rescue, set free, liberate," from Old French delivrer "to set free; remove; save, preserve; hand over (goods)," also used of childbirth, from Late Latin deliberare, from de "away" (see de-) + Latin liberare "to free," from liber "free, unrestricted, unimpeded" (see liberal (adj.)).

The sense of "to bring (a woman) to childbirth," in English is from c. 1300. Sense of "hand over, give, give up, yield" is from c. 1300 in English, which is in opposition to its etymological sense. Meaning "to project, cast, strike, throw" is from c. 1400. Related: Delivered; delivering.

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