Etymology
Advertisement
san 

Japanese honorific title suffixed to personal or family names, 1878, short form of more formal sama.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
NAACP 

abbreviation of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, first attested 1910. The organization was founded Feb. 12, 1909, as National Negro Committee.

Related entries & more 
MYOB 

also m.y.o.b., by 1846, American English slang, an abbreviation of mind your own business. Often in M.Y.O.B. Society, an imaginary organization which a too-inquisitive person would be invited to join.

Related entries & more 
coterie (n.)

"exclusive set or circle of persons who are in the habit of meeting and socializing, a clique," 1738, from French coterie "circle of acquaintances," originally an organization of peasants holding land from a feudal lord (14c.), from cotier "tenant of a cote" (see cottage).

Related entries & more 
prim (adj.)

"formal, stiffly precise in speech or manners," 1709, the sole surviving sense of a word attested first as a verb (1680s) "to assume a formal, precise demeanor," a cant word of uncertain origin, perhaps from French prim "thin, small, delicate" (Old French prim "fine, delicate"), from Latin primus "finest," literally "first" (see prime (adj.)).

Later, "deck out with great nicety, dress to effect, form or dispose with affected preciseness" (1721). It also is attested as a noun from 1700, "formal, precise, or stuck-up person." Related: Primly; primness.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
lecturer (n.)
1580s, as a class of preachers, agent noun from lecture (v.). From 1610s as "one who gives formal lectures."
Related entries & more 
apologetics (n.)
"branch of theology which defends Christian belief," 1733, from apologetic (which is attested from early 15c. as a noun meaning "formal defense"); also see -ics.
Related entries & more 
D.A.R. 

initialism for Daughters of the American Revolution, a non-profit patriotic service organization founded in 1890 for women directly descended from someone involved in the war of independence by the American colonies of Great Britain.

Related entries & more 
protestation (n.)

mid-14c., protestacioun, "affirmation;" late 14c., "avowal, a solemn or formal declaration or assertion," from Old French protestacion "protest, protestation" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin protestationem (nominative protestatio) "a declaration, protestation," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin protestari "declare publicly, testify, protest" (see protest (n.)). By 1640s as "solemn or formal declaration of dissent."

Related entries & more 
Sandinista (n.)
member of a Nicaraguan revolutionary group, 1928, from Spanish, from name of Augusto César Sandino (1893-1934), Nicaraguan nationalist leader; the modern organization of this name was founded in 1963. Related: Sandanistas.
Related entries & more 

Page 5