Etymology
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Scotland Yard (n.)

used for "London Metropolitan Police," 1864, from the name of short street off Whitehall, where from 1829 to 1890 stood the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Force, hence, the force itself, especially the detective branch. After 1890, it was located in "New Scotland Yard."

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plunder (n.)

"goods taken from an enemy by force; act or action of plundering," 1640s, from plunder (v.).

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pierced (adj.)

"penetrated, entered by force, perforated," c. 1400, past-participle adjective from pierce (v.).

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ARVN (n.)
acronym for Army of the Republic of Vietnam, ground military force of South Vietnam, organized 1955.
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extort (v.)

1520s, "obtain by force or compulsion; wrest away by oppressive means," from Latin extortus, past participle of extorquere "obtain by force," literally "to wrench out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + torquere "to twist" (from PIE root *terkw- "to twist"). Related: Extorted; extorting. As a past-participle adjective from early 15c.

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qi (n.)

in Chinese philosophy, "physical life force," 1850, said to be from Chinese qi "air, breath."

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overpower (v.)

"to overcome with superior power, vanquish by superior force," 1590s, from over- + power (v.). Related: Overpowered; overpowering; overpoweringly.

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Schutzstaffel 
internal security force of Nazi Germany, 1930, German, literally "defense squadron." Better known by its initials, S.S.
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breakwater (n.)
"any structure serving to break the force of waves and protect a harbor or shore," 1721, from break (v.) + water (n.1).
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stanine (n.)
"nine-point scale for test scores," introduced by the U.S. Air Force in 1942, from sta(ndard) + nine.
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