Etymology
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taro (n.)
tropical food plant, 1769, from Polynesian (Tahitian or Maori) taro. Compare Hawaiian kalo.
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delicacies (n.)

"things dainty and gratifying to the palate," early 15c., plural of delicacy in the "fine food" sense.

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chum (n.2)

"fish bait," consisting usually of pieces of some other fish, 1857, perhaps from Scottish chum "food."

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Waring 
brand name of a type of food blender, 1944, manufactured by Waring Products Corp., N.Y., U.S.
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horse-meat (n.)
c. 1400, "food for horses," from horse (n.) + meat (n.). From 1853 as "horse-flesh."
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bromatography (n.)

"a description of foods," 1844, from combining form of Greek brōma "food" + -graphy "a writing, recording, or description."

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provision (v.)

"to supply with things necessary," especially a store of food, 1787, from provision (n.). Related: Provisioned; provisioning.

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burrito (n.)
Mexican food dish, 1934, from Spanish, literally "little burro" (see burro).
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takeaway (adj.)
also take-away, 1964 in reference to food-shops, from take (v.) + away. From 1970 as a noun.
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nourishment (n.)

early 15c., norishement, "food, sustenance, that which, taken into the system, tends to nourish," from Old French norissement "food, nourishment," from norrir (see nourish). From c. 1300 as "fostering, upbringing; act of nourishing or state of being nourished." Figurative sense of "that which promotes growth or development of any kind" is by 1570s.

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