Etymology
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art nouveau 

decorative, design, and architectural style popular from c. 1890 to World War I, characterized by intricate designs and flowing curves based on natural forms, 1900, from French l'art nouveau (by 1895), literally "new art" (see novel (adj.)). Called in German Jugendstil.

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influx (n.)
1620s, from French influx (16c.) or directly from Late Latin influxus "a flowing in," from past participle stem of Latin influere "to flow in" (see influence (n.)). Originally of rivers, air, light, spiritual light, etc.; used of people from 1650s.
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hemorrhoids (n.)
plural of hemorrhoid; late 14c., emeroudis, from Old French emorroides (13c.), from Latin hæmorrhoidae, from Greek haimorrhoides (phlebes) "(veins) liable to discharge blood," plural of haimorrhois, from haima "blood" (see -emia) + rhoos "a stream, a flowing," from rhein "to flow" (from PIE root *sreu- "to flow"). Related: Hemmorhoidal.
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fluctuation (n.)

mid-15c., from Old French fluctuacion (12c.) or directly from Latin fluctuationem (nominative fluctuatio) "a wavering, vacillation," noun of action from past-participle stem of fluctuare "to undulate, to move in waves," from fluctus "a wave, billow, surge, a flowing," from past participle of fluere "to flow" (see fluent).

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backwater (n.)
also back-water, late 14c., "water behind a dam," from back (adj.) + water (n.1). Hence flat water without a current near a flowing river, as in a mill race (1820); figurative use of this for any flat, dull place is from 1879.
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Vienna 
capital of Austria, Latin Vindobona, from Gaulish vindo- "white," from Celtic *vindo- (source also of Old Irish find, Welsh gwyn "white;" see Gwendolyn) + bona "foundation, fort." The "white" might be a reference to the river flowing through it. Related: Viennese.
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alluvium (n.)
"matter deposited by flowing water," 1660s, from noun use of Medieval Latin alluvium, neuter of alluvius "washed against," from Latin alluere "wash against," from ad "to, against" (see ad-) + -luere, combining form of lavere "to wash" (from PIE root *leue- "to wash").
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voluble (adj.)

late 14c., "able to turn, revolving;" early 15c., "liable to constant change," from Latin volubilis "that turns around, rolling, flowing," figuratively (of speech) "fluent, rapid," from volvere "to turn around, roll" (from PIE root *wel- (3) "to turn, revolve"). Meaning "fluent, talkative" is recorded from 1580s. Related: Volubly.

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confluent (adj.)

"flowing together, meeting in their courses," late 15c., from Latin confluentem (nominative confluens), present participle of confluere "to flow together," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). The noun meaning "a stream which flows into another" is from 1850.

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effluent (adj.)
mid-15c., from Latin effluentem (nominative effluens) "flowing out," present participle of effluere "to flow out," from assimilated form of ex "out" (see ex-) + fluere "to flow" (see fluent). As a noun, "that which flows out," from 1859; specific meaning "liquid industrial waste" is from 1930.
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