Etymology
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consistency (n.)

1590s, "firmness of matter," from Medieval Latin consistentia   literally "a standing together," or directly from Latin consistentem (nominative consistens), present participle of consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Meaning "state of being in agreement or harmony" (with something) is from 1650s; meaning "steady adherence to principles, patterns of action, etc." is from 1716. Meaning "harmonious connection, as of the parts of a system" is from 1787.

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consistent (adj.)

1570s, "consisting" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin consistentem (nominative consistens), present participle of consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Sense of "standing together in agreement, agreeing" (with with) is first attested 1640s; meaning "marked by consistency" is from 1732. The literal, physical sense survives in consistency. Related: Consistently.

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cartilage (n.)

"gristle; firm, elastic animal tissue," early 15c., from Old French cartilage and directly from Latin cartilaginem (nominative cartilago) "cartilage, gristle," which is possibly related to cratis "wickerwork" (see hurdle (n.)).

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stet 

direction to printer to disregard correction made to text, 1755, from Latin stet "let it stand," third person singular present subjunctive of stare "to stand, stand upright, be stiff" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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pertinacious (adj.)

"unyielding, persistent, resolute" (in holding to a purpose, opinion, course of action, etc.), 1620s, from pertinacy "stubbornness" (late 14c.), from Latin pertinacia, from pertinax "very firm, tenacious" (see pertinacity) + -ous. Related: Pertinaciously.

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fast (adj.)

Old English fæst "firmly fixed, steadfast, constant; secure; enclosed, watertight; strong, fortified," probably from Proto-Germanic *fastu- "firm, fast" (source also of Old Frisian fest, Old Norse fastr, Dutch vast, German fest), from PIE root *past- "firm, solid" (source of Sanskrit pastyam "dwelling place").

Meaning "rapid, quick" is from 1550s, from fast (adv.) , in which entry the attempt is made to explain how a root meaning "firm, solid" came variously to yield words for "refrain from eating" (fast (v.)) and "rapid, quick." Of colors, from 1650s; of clocks, from 1840. The sense of "living an unrestrained life, eager in pursuit of pleasure" (usually of women) is from 1746 (fast living is from 1745).

Fast buck recorded from 1947; fast food is first attested 1951. Fast lane is by 1966; the fast track originally was in horse-racing (1934), one that permits maximum speed; figurative sense by 1960s. Fast-forward is by 1948, originally of audio tape.

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stere (n.)

unit of the metric system for solid measure, 1798, from French stère "unit of volume equal to one cubic meter," from Greek stereos "solid, stiff, firm" (from PIE root *ster- (1) "stiff"). Little used, cubic meter generally serving instead.

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shtetl (n.)

"Jewish small town or village in Eastern Europe," 1949, from Yiddish, literally "little town," from diminutive of German Stadt "city, town," from Old High German stat "place" (ultimately from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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destination (n.)

1590s, "act of appointing, designation," from Latin destinationem (nominative destinatio) "purpose, design," from past-participle stem of destinare "determine, appoint, choose, make firm or fast," from de- "completely, formally" (see de-) + -stinare (related to stare "to stand") from PIE *steno-, suffixed form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

From 1650s as "purpose for which anything is intended or appointed." Meaning  "predetermined end of a journey, voyage, or transmission" (1813) is short for place of destination (1787) "place to which a thing is appointed or directed."

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dryad (n.)

nymph of the woods, 1550s (plural Driades is attested from late 14c.), from Latin dryas, from Greek dryas (plural dryades) "wood nymph," from drus (genitive dryos) "oak," from PIE root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast," with specialized senses "wood, tree." Related: Dryadic.

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