Etymology
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tryst (n.)

late 14c., "appointment to meet at a certain time and place," from Old French tristre "waiting place, appointed station in hunting," probably from a Scandinavian source such as Old Norse treysta "to trust, make firm," from Proto-Germanic *treuwaz "having or characterized by good faith," from PIE *drew-o-, a suffixed form of the root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." The notion would be "place one waits trustingly." As a verb, late 14c. Related: Trysting.

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stable (adj.)

mid-12c., "trustworthy, reliable;" mid-13c., "constant, steadfast; virtuous;" from Old French stable, estable "constant, steadfast, unchanging," from Latin stabilis "firm, steadfast, stable, fixed," figuratively "durable, unwavering," literally "able to stand," from PIE *stedhli-, suffixed form of root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." From c. 1300 as "well-founded, well-established, secure" (of governments, etc.). Physical sense of "secure against falling" is recorded from late 14c.; also "of even temperament." Of nuclear isotopes, from 1904.

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irresolute (adj.)

"not firm in purpose, wavering, given to doubt or hesitation," 1570s, from Latin irresolutus "not loosed, not loosened," from assimilated form of in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + resolutus (see resolute). Related: Irresolutely.

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footing (n.)

late 13c., "a base, foundation;" late 14c., "position of the feet on the ground, stance," a gerundive formation from foot (n.). Figurative meaning "firm or secure position" is from 1580s; that of "condition on which anything is established" is from 1650s.

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fastness (n.)

"a place not easily forced, a stronghold," late Old English fæstnes "firmness, strongness, massiveness, stability; the firmament," from fast (adj.) in its older sense of "firm, fixed in place" + -ness.

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epistasis (n.)

"the checking of a discharge," medical Latin, from Greek epistasis "a stopping, stoppage, a halting," from epi "upon" (see epi-) + stasis "a stopping or standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

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consistent (adj.)

1570s, "consisting" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin consistentem (nominative consistens), present participle of consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Sense of "standing together in agreement, agreeing" (with with) is first attested 1640s; meaning "marked by consistency" is from 1732. The literal, physical sense survives in consistency. Related: Consistently.

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consistency (n.)

1590s, "firmness of matter," from Medieval Latin consistentia   literally "a standing together," or directly from Latin consistentem (nominative consistens), present participle of consistere "to stand firm, take a standing position, stop, halt," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sistere "to place," causative of stare "to stand, be standing," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm."

Meaning "state of being in agreement or harmony" (with something) is from 1650s; meaning "steady adherence to principles, patterns of action, etc." is from 1716. Meaning "harmonious connection, as of the parts of a system" is from 1787.

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cartilage (n.)

"gristle; firm, elastic animal tissue," early 15c., from Old French cartilage and directly from Latin cartilaginem (nominative cartilago) "cartilage, gristle," which is possibly related to cratis "wickerwork" (see hurdle (n.)).

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dendro- 

word-forming element meaning "tree," from Greek dendron "tree," sometimes especially "fruit tree" (as opposed to hylē "timber"), from PIE *der-drew-, from root *deru- "to be firm, solid, steadfast," also forming words for "wood, tree."

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