Etymology
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splice (n.)
1620s (implied in splicing), first recorded in writing of Capt. John Smith, from splice (v.). Motion picture film sense is from 1923. In colloquial use, "marriage union, wedding" (1830).
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art (adj.)
"produced with conscious artistry" (as opposed to popular or folk), 1890, from art (n.), possibly from influence of German kunstlied "art song." Art film is from 1960; art rock from 1968.
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Tony 
masc. proper name, short for Anthony. Tony Curtis, style of men's haircut (usually with a D.A. at the back), is from 1956, from screen name of U.S. film star Bernard Schwarz (1925-2010).
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oater (n.)

"Western film" (featuring horse-riding cowboys and Indians), 1946, American English, from oat, as the typical food of horses. Oats opera (on the model of soap opera) is by 1937 in U.S. slang.

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Shangri-La (n.)

imaginary earthly paradise, by 1938, from Shangri-La, name of Tibetan utopia in James Hilton's novel "Lost Horizon" (1933, film version 1937). In Tibetan, la means "mountain pass."

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Cinerama (n.)

proprietary name for a form of cinema film projected on a wide, curved screen, 1951, from cinema + -rama. Purists point out that the proper formation would be *Cinorama.

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dark-room (n.)

also darkroom, in photography, "room from which any light that would affect a photographic plate or film has been excluded," 1841, from dark (adj.) + room (n.).

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Manchuria 

large part of China east of Mongolia and north of Korea, named for the Manchu (literally "pure") people + -ia. Related: Manchurian. Manchurian Candidate is 1959 as a novel, 1962 as a film.

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Mylar (n.)
proper name for a polyester film, 1954, trademarked by E.I. Du Pont de Nemours and Co., Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A. Like many Du Pont names, it doesn't mean anything, they just liked the sound.
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preview (v.)

c. 1600, "to see beforehand," from pre- "before" + view (v.). Marked "rare" in Century Dictionary (1895). The meaning "to show (a film, etc.) before its public opening" is from 1928. Related: Previewed; previewing.

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