Etymology
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stand-in (n.)
"one who substitutes for another," 1928, from the verbal phrase, attested from 1904 in show business slang in the sense "to substitute, to fill the place of another," from stand (v.) + in (adv.).
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comply (v.)

early 14c., "to carry out, fulfill" (transitive), probably from Old French compli, past participle of complir "to accomplish, fulfill, carry out," from Vulgar Latin *complire, from Latin complere "to fill up," transferred to "fulfill, finish (a task)," from com-, here probably as an intensive prefix (see com-), + plere "to fill" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill").

Intransitive sense of "to consent, act in accordance with another's will or desire" is attested from c. 1600 and might have been influenced by ply (v.2), or perhaps it is a reintroduction from Italian, where complire had come to mean "satisfy by 'filling up' the forms of courtesy" (compare compliment (n.)).

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repeople (v.)

also re-people, "to populate again, fill again with people," late 15c.; see re- "again" + people (v.). Related: Repeopled; repeopling.

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brim (v.)
"to fill to the brim," 1610s, from brim (n.). Intransitive sense ("be full to the brim") attested from 1818. To brim over "overflow" is from 1825. Related: Brimmed; brimming.
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supplement (n.)
late 14c., from Latin supplementum "that which fills up, that with which anything is made full or whole, something added to supply a deficiency," from supplere "to fill up" (see supply (v.)).
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polyploidy (n.)

"condition of having more than two homologous sets of chromosomes," 1922, from German polyploidie (1910), from polyploid, from Greek polys "much, many" (from PIE root *pele- (1) "to fill") + -ploid, from -ploos "fold" (from PIE root *pel- (2) "to fold").

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stuffing (n.)
1520s, "material used for filling a cushion;" 1530s, "seasoned mixture used to stuff fowls before cooking," verbal noun from stuff (v.) in the sense "fill the inside of a bird before cooking" (late 14c.).
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truss (v.)
c. 1200, "to load, load up," from Anglo-French trusser, Old French trusser, torser "to load, fill, pack, fasten" (11c.), from Old French trousse, torse (see truss (n.)). Related: Trussed; trussing.
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begging (n.)
"act or habit of asking for alms, mendicancy, a beggar's way of life," late 14c., verbal noun from beg (v.). To go begging "find no one to fill or take" is from 1590s. Related: Beggingly.
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shanghai (v.)
"to drug a man unconscious and ship him as a sailor," 1854, American English, from the practice of kidnapping to fill the crews of ships making extended voyages, such as to the Chinese seaport of Shanghai.
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